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I have a df :

>>> df
                 STK_ID  EPS  cash
STK_ID RPT_Date                   
601166 20111231  601166  NaN   NaN
600036 20111231  600036  NaN    12
600016 20111231  600016  4.3   NaN
601009 20111231  601009  NaN   NaN
601939 20111231  601939  2.5   NaN
000001 20111231  000001  NaN   NaN

Then I just want the records whose EPS is not NaN, that is, df.drop(....) will return the dataframe as below:

                  STK_ID  EPS  cash
STK_ID RPT_Date                   
600016 20111231  600016  4.3   NaN
601939 20111231  601939  2.5   NaN

How to do that ?

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7  
    
df.dropna(subset = ['column1_name', 'column2_name', 'column3_name']) –  osa Sep 5 at 23:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Don't drop. Just take rows where EPS is finite:

df = df[np.isfinite(df['EPS'])]
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thanks. Good solution. –  bigbug Nov 17 '12 at 13:14
47  
I'd recommend using pandas.notnull instead of np.isfinite –  Wes McKinney Nov 21 '12 at 3:08
    
@WesMcKinney Does this not then disregard 0 values then as well, rather than just NaN? –  shootingstars May 14 at 14:05

This question is already resolved, but...

...also consider the solution suggested by Wouter in his original comment. The ability to handle missing data, including dropna(), is built into pandas explicitly. Aside from potentially improved performance over doing it manually, these functions also come with a variety of options which may be useful.

In [24]: df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(10,3))

In [25]: df.ix[::2,0] = np.nan; df.ix[::4,1] = np.nan; df.ix[::3,2] = np.nan;

In [26]: df
Out[26]:
          0         1         2
0       NaN       NaN       NaN
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
4       NaN       NaN  0.050742
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
6       NaN  1.036043       NaN
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
8       NaN       NaN  0.637482
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

In [27]: df.dropna()     #drop all rows that have any NaN values
Out[27]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295

In [28]: df.dropna(how='all')     #drop only if ALL columns are NaN
Out[28]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
4       NaN       NaN  0.050742
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
6       NaN  1.036043       NaN
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
8       NaN       NaN  0.637482
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

In [29]: df.dropna(thresh=2)   #Drop row if it does not have at least two values that are **not** NaN
Out[29]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

In [30]: df.dropna(subset=[1])   #Drop only if NaN in specific column (as asked in the question)
Out[30]:
          0         1         2
1  2.677677 -1.466923 -0.750366
2       NaN  0.798002 -0.906038
3  0.672201  0.964789       NaN
5 -1.250970  0.030561 -2.678622
6       NaN  1.036043       NaN
7  0.049896 -0.308003  0.823295
9 -0.310130  0.078891       NaN

There are also other options (See docs at http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/generated/pandas.DataFrame.dropna.html), including dropping columns instead of rows.

Pretty handy!

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4  
you can also use df.dropna(subset = ['column_name']). Hope that saves at least one person the extra 5 seconds of 'what am I doing wrong'. Great answer, +1 –  James Tobin Jun 18 at 14:07
    
@JamesTobin, I just spent 20 minutes to write a function for that! The official documentation was very cryptic: "Labels along other axis to consider, e.g. if you are dropping rows these would be a list of columns to include". I was unable to understand, what they meant... –  osa Sep 5 at 23:52

I know this has already been answered, but just for the sake of a purely pandas solution to this specific question as opposed to the general description from Aman (which was wonderful) and in case anyone else happens upon this:

import pandas as pd
df = df[pd.notnull(df['EPS'])]
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Actually, the specific answer would be: df.dropna(subset=['EPS']) (based on the general description of Aman, of course this does also work) –  joris Apr 23 at 12:53
    
notnull is also what Wes (author of Pandas) suggested in his comment on another answer. –  fantabolous Jul 9 at 3:24

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