Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using a vector of pointers and the iterator that it comes with in C++. The way I originally wrote it would cause a seg fnault, but with a seemingly trivial change, declaring and initializing an unused variable the seg fault goes away. Does anyone know why?

Here's the code that seg faults. The final line that successfully executes is line 8 (found via printf statements) and uncommeting line 4 get rids of the segfault:

1 Intersect RayTracer::closestShape(Ray r){
2    vector<Shape *>::iterator itStart = scene.getShapes().begin();
3    vector<Shape *>::iterator itEnd = scene.getShapes().end();
4    //vector<Shape *> sceneShapes = scene.getShapes();  This is the unused line that will cause the code to run successfully if I uncomment it.
5    Intersect closest = Intersect();
6    for(;itStart != itEnd; itStart++){
7       Intersect currentIntersect = (*itStart)->intersect(r);
8      if(currentIntersect.isHit()){
9          if(currentIntersect.getT() < closest.getT()){
10              closest = currentIntersect;
            }
        }
     }
     return closest;
}

And here's the working version that no longer segfaults:

1 Intersect RayTracer::closestShape(Ray r){
2    vector<Shape *> sceneShapes = scene.getShapes();
3    vector<Shape *>::iterator itStart = sceneShapes.begin();
4    vector<Shape *>::iterator itEnd = sceneShapes.end();
5    Intersect closest = Intersect();
6    for(;itStart != itEnd; itStart++){
7       Intersect currentIntersect = (*itStart)->intersect(r);
8      if(currentIntersect.isHit()){
9          if(currentIntersect.getT() < closest.getT()){
10              closest = currentIntersect;
            }
        }
     }
     return closest;
}

If anyone could provide clarification as to why this is happening, that would be greatly appreciated! Please let me know if there's anything I can add to clarify my problem.

share|improve this question
5  
vector<Shape *>::iterator itStart = scene.getShapes().begin(); creates a temporary that dies when the statement ends, so the iterator from it isn't much good. –  chris Nov 16 '12 at 9:39
    
If you can, run this code in a tool such as Valgrind. It will help you by telling you where you have memory corruption, which is generally the root cause of such "adding a pointless extra variable fixes a crash" symptoms. –  unwind Nov 16 '12 at 9:41
    
Do you realize that you are copying vectors? In the first version, you get begin() of a copy of the vector, then you get end() of a different copy of the vector. In the second version you get one copy ... but copying vectors isn't a good idea; use refs. Also, you quite misstate the difference between these code samples ... the second declares, initializes, and then uses your "unused" variable in two statements. It's bizarre to say that it is merely the addition of an "unrelated" line of code. –  Jim Balter Nov 16 '12 at 10:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

vector<Shape *> sceneShapes = scene.getShapes(); creates persistent object on the stack. itStart and itEnd points to valid memory. In your first example iterators points to non-valid memory because they points to temporary object from call scene.getShapes() which had been immediately destroyed and invalidate your iterators.

When you uncomment your //vector<Shape *> sceneShapes = scene.getShapes(); line it returns vector which is feet to same memory bounds as temporary was and iterators are valid again! But it is not 100% chance that it will be the same and you must be very careful to avoid such problems.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome. Thank you for your answer. That explanation makes perfect sense for the second example. However, I'm still a bit confused as to why the first example will work fine without any errors when I uncomment line 4, even though the intialization of sceneShapes occurs AFTER the iterators are initialized. –  Ray Kyaw Nov 16 '12 at 10:06
    
Updated my answer –  Denis Ermolin Nov 16 '12 at 10:09

This function:

scene.getShapes()

is probably returning by value, which means when you call begin() and end() on it in the first example, you are calling these on a temporary that has not been bound.

If you cannot change the function to return by reference, you can bind a const reference to it, then call begin() and end() on the const reference which will also work (in addition to making the proper copy that was your fix).

If you can change the function to return by reference, that would be better. Ideally a const reference.

Note: Returning a const reference will mean that you cannot resize the vector or change the pointers in it, but what the pointers point to can still be changed. These are pointers to Shape.

share|improve this answer

As it the cause for crash is already answered, let me try to answer why un-commenting the line you had mentioned might cause the crash to go away. The temporary unnamed vector that is returned from the function would be stored on the stack, which would contain pointer to the backing store (for the elements which in your case is pointer to Shape objects) on heap and probably few others to mention size or end etc.

The problem happens when the itertors are pointing to the backing store (start and end) are no more valid because the temporary vector would be destroyed at the end of the statement (2 times indeed) and along with it the backing store of memory (which contains pointer to Shape objects) is returned to the heap manager. When a named vector object is created on the stack (when you uncomment that commented out line) the vector code is probably going to get the same block of memory - that the unnamed vector got - from the heap manager and there by making the iterators (pointers) valid and hence avoiding a crash. In the absence of the named vector the heap manager could end up breaking the block to pieces or combine it with big block and allocate it other callers who might have called subsequently.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.