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I've got technical problem with a new C# program I'm developing. In this project I need to communicate with another none windows based system on a TCP/IP network. Al the software written on the other system is done in C and any other future development will be done in C/C++ aswell. The protocols are all done in C by another engineer and definitions of the protocols are all done using C typedef struct's defining all the variables and using memcpy to extract/put the data packets which works fantastic for C. All my protocols are supplied as C header files with all the typedef and struct's in them and any changes made to the protocol in the future will be done in the same way.

My question is, if there is any way to use them in C#?

I've tried to compile them as a class into a DLL library but not working cause C# can only use managed C dll's. If I try and compile as managed C class, it just becomes a mess due to the fact that there are many arrays in the protocol and because the C code has to conform to a bunch of mill specs, many of the variables have been typedef'd. Now I could go and redo all the structures in C# but that's going to take a lot of time and I'm going to have to redo it every time a change is made or something added to protocol. Not even to mention the danger of errors slipping in every time I do it.

How it worked with my C projects is that the other engineer would just supply me with the updated header files.

So is there any way to use those header files directly in C# or a automated conversion I can do every time the protocol is updated? Well I basically need to use this header file to extract the data from the data stream coming over the TCP/IP connection (without begin able to use memcpy)

Reason for using C# is because I use a lot of graphics in WPF and Visual C++ doesn't support WPF

Any help or suggestions would be much appreciated?

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2  
Protobuf might prove itself useful, but it might require rewriting existing code. –  CodeCaster Nov 16 '12 at 9:47
    
It's a pity they don't do C#... –  gerharddvs Nov 16 '12 at 10:33
    
They do. –  CodeCaster Nov 16 '12 at 10:45

3 Answers 3

I've once had to use C headers in C# to get definitions of marshalled structures sent via TCP/IP. The approach we used was parsing the header files by T4 Text Template. It's a somewhat lenghty task though, you have to write C parser good enough for your headers and use it to produce .cs file, so there is a lot of string mess. For us, it was a good enough solution, so it may help you as well.

Have a look at T4 here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb126445.aspx

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If I understand this T4 method correctly. What I can do with it is to write some code/function to convert say the structures in the header file into a equivalent class/struct in cs file that in turn I can use to dump the data package into coming from the TCP/IP data stream? –  gerharddvs Nov 16 '12 at 10:12
    
Yes, you can use it to produce a C# code file with struct definitions, that are equal to the ones defined in the C header. You can then use whatever serialization to send the structure to the TCP stream. In my case, I was only working on the client side, so I had no control over the protocol. It was as you say, dumping the binary data into the stream. If you have any control over the protocol however, I would suggest using another format, for example XML, YAML or even JSON. That way you will have an option to decouple the server and client, if such need arises. –  Honza Brestan Nov 16 '12 at 10:47
    
Well I'm probably going to have to do this conversion very often because my main programming language is actually C/C++ and most of my projects are in these languages. I only use C# where we need to use a fancy GUI's. The variable typedef's are kind of company polocy to do with MIL specs and safety standards so I can't really change that. So I would like to make some kind of converter to do the conversion now and the I can use it in the future. Changing the header files are out of the question cause they still have to work on the original C compiler as well... –  gerharddvs Nov 16 '12 at 11:13

Not really an answer, more like one possible good solution:

Create a defintion file containing the information now in C header file. Then use that to generate both the .h header and suitable C# source code.

If the data is fairly simple, then also simple key-value file format, or even a csv file, could be used. But if it's more complex, then it's best to use XML, which is simpler to parse programmatically.

If there is resistance to having a language-independent definition file, then you could try to get the .c header file to follow some string formatting rules, so you can parse it simply and generate C# code from it (just make sure that the one writing the .h understands, that it is no longer C, it's actually your own C-like definition language, and any extra C stuff has to go to another file).

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What makes this so complicated is that almost every variable type is typedef'd (ex: unsigned char is UINT8_t) and then there is typedef's of struct's within struct's and then some of these struct's are in arrays so it gets hectic...(you can take one struct and probably expand it into 10 other arrays and struct's) –  gerharddvs Nov 16 '12 at 10:23
    
@gerharddvs In that case, I'd strongly suggest you move the definition into an XML file, and generate any needed language specific files from it... That is, "demand" (whatever that may mean in your situation), that you get relevant parts of the protocol definition in language independent, easily machine-parseable format (=XML). –  hyde Nov 16 '12 at 10:59
    
Well I'm probably going to have to do this conversion very often because my main programming language is actually C/C++ and most of my projects are in these languages. I only use C# where we need to use a fancy GUI's. The variable typedef's are kind of company polocy to do with MIL specs and safety standards so I can't really change that. So I would like to make some kind of converter to do the conversion now and the I can use it in the future. Changing the header files are out of the question cause they still have to work on the original C compiler as well... –  gerharddvs Nov 16 '12 at 11:13

You don't and can't use a header file in C# you you need to compile it into dll and from c#

in the c File you need to define #define DLLAPI __declspec(dllexport) and define the methods like like the following DLLAPI *return-value-data-type function-name* and from c# you need to call it like below

[DllImport(@"*dll-path*")]
        public static extern *return-value-datatype function-name*

and if it is needed you do marshalling for datatypes like the following

[DllImport(@"*dll-path*")]
        public static extern void InitParam([MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string inputFile,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string outputFile,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string templateFile,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string userName,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string manifestFilePath,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string usersRightList);

        [DllImport(@"*dll-path*")]
        public static extern Int32 ProtectDocument(
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]string validToDate);

        [DllImport(@"*dll-path*")]
        public static extern void DebugGeneratedFiles(
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string singedIssuenceLicenseFilePath,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPWStr)] string encryptedContentOutputFilePath);
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I'm aware that I can't use header files in C# hens the problem... Your method looks like it might work but I'm then going to have to redo it every-time the protocol is modified and that's what I'm trying to avoid... –  gerharddvs Nov 16 '12 at 10:15

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