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I need to allocate a workload on different processes, depending on the number of logical cores of the user's PC. The workload is done by the following code :

static void work()
{
    WorkData myData = new WorkData();
    Worker myWorker = new Worker(myData);
    MyWorker.doWork()
}

I count the logical cores with this code :

int nbProcessors = 1;
foreach (var item in new System.Management.ManagementObjectSearcher("Select *  from Win32_ComputerSystem").Get())
{
    nbProcessors = Convert.ToInt32(item["NumberOfLogicalProcessors"]);
}

Now, I have to do my work() 10000 times, by sharing the work on the logical cores, so in the case of my pc it would mean starting 8 processes with 1250 iterations of work() each. I also need each process to have its own data, so that I don't get conflicts.

How can I do that?

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2  
Is there a reason you cannot use Parallell.ForAll()? –  flindeberg Nov 16 '12 at 9:57
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you should review Parallel methods and ThreadPool methods.
Both of this classes are counting on current workstation configuration, so you can easily use them for your task.

Example of Parrallel usage:

Parallel Loops:

int n = 10 000;
Parallel.For(0, n, (i, loopState) =>
{
  // ... 
  if (/* stopping condition is true */)
  {
    loopState.Break();
    return;   
  }
});

Thread Pool task-oriented example:

public void DoWork()
{
    // Queue a task.
    System.Threading.ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
        new System.Threading.WaitCallback(SomeLongTask));
    // Queue another task.
    System.Threading.ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(
        new System.Threading.WaitCallback(AnotherLongTask));
}

private void SomeLongTask(Object state)
{
    // Insert code to perform a long task.
}

private void AnotherLongTask(Object state)
{
    // Insert code to perform a long task.
}

Update from comments:

Task Parallel Library (Parralel class) internally uses Threading.Tasks namespace, with some process managing:

the scheduling of threads on the ThreadPool

Two another links about: Task Parallelism and Data Parallelism. I think second link can help you with balancing the work for your data.

When possible, the scheduler redistributes work among multiple threads and processors if the workload becomes unbalanced.

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If I got it right, Parallel.For is multi processing while threadpool is just multithreading in one process isnt it ? –  Rayjax Nov 16 '12 at 10:10
    
@user1397271 updated answer. –  VMAtm Nov 16 '12 at 10:29
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Look at TPL:

   Parallel.For (0,10000, item => {
       WorkData myData = new WorkData();
       Worker myWorker = new Worker(myData);
       MyWorker.doWork()
   });

it will automatically split between cores. But if you need, you can set number of threads manually

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Ummm, you know you can get the logical processor count by accessing property:

Environment.ProcessorCount

Which returns 8 on my quad-core HT machine - kind of checks out.

If you have a fixed number of iterations (instead of doing e.g. iterations over a list or something) then you can go with:

var parallelOptions = new ParallelOptions
{
    MaxDegreeOfParallelistm = Environment.ProcessorCount
};


//edited per comment
Parallel.For(0, 10000, parallelOptions, () =>
{
    WorkData myData = new WorkData();
    Worker myWorker = new Worker(myData);
    MyWorker.doWork() 
});

If you had to do some partitioning of a list, then partitioner comes into play:

var partitioner = Partitioner.Create(yourList);
var parallelOptions = new ParallelOptions
{
    MaxDegreeOfParallelism = Environment.ProcessorCount
};

Parallel.ForEach(partitioner, parallelOptions, (listItem, loopState) =>
{
   //Do something
}

Although mind you that AFAIK the Parallel loops by default spawn as many threads as there are cores.

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Actually if I do iterationsPerCore = 10000/Environment.ProcessorCount; PParallel.For(0, iterationsPerCore... It shares 1250 iterations between the 8 cores –  Rayjax Nov 16 '12 at 10:20
    
@user1397271 Oh, right, excuse my brainfart, changing... –  Patryk Ćwiek Nov 16 '12 at 10:21
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Since C# 4.0 you can use Task Parallel Library, it does the load balancing automatically:

Parallel.For(0, 10000, p => work());

or

ParallelEnumerable.Range(0, 10000).ForAll(p => work());

See: Parallel Programming in the .NET Framework

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Take a look at this threading guide.
Goes from very basic threads to parallel programming in a very understandable way.
It's 5 chapters from the book c# 4.0 in a nutshell.
Personally it helped me a lot to understand threading better.

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Please, move some code here, don't just leave a link. –  VMAtm Nov 16 '12 at 12:22
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