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Let's say I have this one:

[Pure]
public static TimeSpan Seconds(this int i)
{
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<TimeSpan>() == TimeSpan.FromSeconds(i));
    return TimeSpan.FromSeconds(i);
}

Is that right that I ensure the contract result in such strict way, or it is unneccessary?


And in this case?

[Pure]
public static T IfTrue<T>(this bool b, T value)
{
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<T>().Equals(b ? value : default(T)));
    return b ? value : default(T);
}

My questions are:

  1. Am I right when indicating such precise contract ensurance?
  2. Am I obligated to make such strict contract ensurances and why?
  3. Is it okay, that my contract ensurance repeats (in many cases in my application) the return statement?
share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to accomplish? –  gdoron Nov 16 '12 at 10:49
    
I'm learning Code Contracts. –  AgentFire Nov 16 '12 at 10:50
    
This looks like a good practice gone too far. Avoid. –  Baboon Nov 16 '12 at 12:55
1  
Here, you're testing that the return keyword in C# actually works. Seriously? You should test for specific values, and even then, in such a trivial method, it would be pointless. –  Baboon Nov 16 '12 at 13:12
1  
Look at Damien's answer, those contracts make sense. –  Baboon Nov 16 '12 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Think about the word "Contract" - what do you, in writing your code, wish to guarantee to your callers (or for Requires, what do you want them to guarantee for you).

For trivial examples such as the ones you've shown, I can't think of much you'd want to include as a contract. Maybe for the first, I'd go for:

[Pure]
public static TimeSpan Seconds(this int i)
{
    Contract.Requires(i>0);
    Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<TimeSpan>().TotalSeconds > 0.0);
    return TimeSpan.FromSeconds(i);
}

I'll guarantee to my callers that I'll produce a positive result. Obviously, this similar contract could be given if I included more complex mathematics inside this method. I'll give guarantees on the range, but I won't guarantee exactly how the result is computed (since that may be subject to change).

share|improve this answer

Method purity means, that method call does not causes any caller visible side-effects to object state. That's all.

Of course, pure method can be public, and can define its own pre- and post-conditions. It depends on concrete method use-cases.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is more about Contract.Ensures usage. Could you please tell me is that method neccessary have to be there, or not, and why? –  AgentFire Nov 16 '12 at 11:43
    
@AgentFire: what method and where's there? If you mean, is Contract.Ensures necessary in [Pure] methods, that the answer is "no". Can Contract.Ensures be placed in [Pure] methods? Yes. When Contract.Ensures can be placed in [Pure] methods? It depends on concrete method purposes. –  Dennis Nov 16 '12 at 12:39
    
Okay, sorry, the concrete question is updated. –  AgentFire Nov 16 '12 at 12:48

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