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I want to store and load diverse program data in a Delphi project. This data ranges from simple strings to more complex recurring configuration object data.

As we all know ini files provide a fast and easy way to store program data but are limited to key-value representations.

XML is often the weapon of choice when it comes to requirements like this but I want to know if there is an alternative to XML.

Recently I found superobject for Delphi which seems to be a lot easier to handle than XML. Is there anything to be said against using JSON for such "non web task"?

Are you aware of other options that support data storage and load in plain text (like ini, xml, json) in Delphi?

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I personally use YAML but there's no readily available parser/emitter. Otherwise, you've listed the prime candidates. –  David Heffernan Nov 16 '12 at 11:28
    
Personally I find XML the most expressive method for configuration data. The upside is that you can easily edit XML files. I have made my own xml to object/ object to xml streaming library for this exact purpose... –  whosrdaddy Nov 16 '12 at 12:05
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If you derive your TConfig objects from TComponent, then you can also use the VCL built in streaming (in both, human readable format as well as binary) mechanisms. –  iamjoosy Nov 16 '12 at 12:35
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@whosrdaddy I personally regard human reading and editing XML files to be an horrendous experience..... ;-) –  David Heffernan Nov 16 '12 at 12:57
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In fact it doesn't matter which storing format you choose (ini, xml, json, whatever). Build an abstract Configuration class that fits all your needs and after that think about the concrete class and the concrete storing format, and decide by how easy to implement and maybe human readability –  Sir Rufo Nov 16 '12 at 12:59

2 Answers 2

In fact it doesn't matter which storing format you choose (ini, xml, json, whatever). Build an abstract Configuration class that fits all your needs and after that think about the concrete class and the concrete storing format, and decide by how easy to implement and maybe human readability

In some cases you also want to have different configuration aspects (global, machine, user).

With your configuration class you can easily mix them together (use global if not user defined) and can also mix up storing formats (global-config from DB, machine-config from Registry, user-config from file).

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Good old INI Files work great for me, in combination with the built in TIniFile and TMemIniFile classes in the IniFiles unit

Benefits of INI files;

  1. Not binary.
  2. Easier to move from machine to machine than Registry settings.
  3. Easy to inspect and view.
  4. Unlike XML, it's simple and human readable

  5. INI files are easy to modify either by hand or by tool and are almost bulletproof, whereas it's easy to make a malformed JSON or XML that is completely unreadable, it's hard to do more than "damage one section" of an INI file. Simplicity wins.

Drawbacks:

  1. Unlike XML and Registry it's more or less "two levels", sections and items.

  2. TMemIniFile doesn't order the results in any controllable way. I often wish I could control the order of items in my ini files if they are generated by a human being, I would like the order to be preserved, and TMemIniFile does not preserve order, thus I find I do not love TMemIniFile as much as love plain old TIniFile.

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If you don't love TMemIniFile you can implement your own InMemory CustomIniFile. And with use of SubSections it comes a bit closer to XML and JSON. –  Sir Rufo Nov 16 '12 at 20:27
    
... :-) While having a lot less punctuation. –  Warren P Nov 16 '12 at 21:08

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