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I have the following awk script where I seem to need to next curly brackets. But this is not allowed in awk. How can I fix this issue in my script here?

The problem is in the if(inqueued == 1).

BEGIN { 
   print "Log File Analysis Sequencing for " + FILENAME;
   inqueued=0;
   connidtext="";
   thisdntext="";
}

    /message EventQueued/ { 
     inqueued=1;
         print $0; 
    }

     if(inqueued == 1) {
          /AttributeConnID/ { connidtext = $0; }
          /AttributeThisDN / { thisdntext = $2; } #space removes DNRole
     }

    #if first chars are a timetamp we know we are out of queued text
     /\@?[0-9]+:[0-9}+:[0-9]+/ 
     {
     if(thisdntext != 0) {
         print connidtext;
             print thisdntext;
         }
       inqueued = 0; connidtext=""; thisdntext=""; 
     }
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

awk is made up of <condition> { <action> } segments. Within an <action> you can specify conditions just like you do in C with if or while constructs. You have a few other problems too, just re-write your script as:

BEGIN { 
   print "Log File Analysis Sequencing for", FILENAME
}

/message EventQueued/ { 
    inqueued=1
    print 
}

inqueued == 1 {
    if (/AttributeConnID/) { connidtext = $0 }
    if (/AttributeThisDN/) { thisdntext = $2 } #space removes DNRole
}

#if first chars are a timetamp we know we are out of queued text
/\@?[0-9]+:[0-9}+:[0-9]+/ {
     if (thisdntext != 0) {
         print connidtext
         print thisdntext
     }
     inqueued=connidtext=thisdntext="" 
}

I don't know if that'll do what you want or not, but it's syntactically correct at least.

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That works, thanks. Although I get a blank filename for some reason. I call like this: awk -f learn5.awk testlog.log > mysequence.txt –  arcomber Nov 16 '12 at 13:54
    
that's because you're doing the print in the BEGIN section which gets executed BEFORE any files are opened so there is no FILENAME. Change BEGIN to FNR==1. –  Ed Morton Nov 16 '12 at 16:22
    
I found out you can also use ARGV[1] in BEGIN too. –  arcomber Nov 16 '12 at 16:23
    
Yes, but that's not necessarily the name of a file, it could be a variable getting populated, e,g, with awk '{script}' var="abc" file. The way I suggested is the right way for your example. –  Ed Morton Nov 16 '12 at 16:29
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try to change

  if(inqueued == 1) {
              /AttributeConnID/ { connidtext = $0; }
              /AttributeThisDN / { thisdntext = $2; } #space removes DNRole
         }

to

 inqueued == 1 {
             if($0~ /AttributeConnID/) { connidtext = $0; }
              if($0~/AttributeThisDN /) { thisdntext = $2; } #space removes DNRole
         }

or

 inqueued == 1 && /AttributeConnID/{connidtext = $0;}
 inqueued == 1 && /AttributeThisDN /{ thisdntext = $2; } #space removes DNRole
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