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I am new to multi-threading in C#. But from reading various chapters in C# books and tutorials. I know that the best way to develop classes which are used in multithreaded applications is to create immutable classes.

But I am not too sure about how to deal with classes that expose a read/write property. In some articles that I have read the author has placed locks around the read/write property e.g.

public class Test
{
  private string property1;

  public string ClassProperty
  {
   get
   {
     lock 
     {
       return Property1;
     }
   }
   set
   {
      lock 
      {
        Property1 = value;
      }
   }
 }
}

I know that with any shared variable declared and used within a class that it needs to be locked in multithreaded applications. But some articles that I have read have suggested that the above code will not work if the property being exposed is a reference type. Others have suggested that you cannot make a class with exposed properties thread-safe? Does anyone have a definite answer on this topic?

Thanks

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1  
I recommend you read this free ebook: Albahari –  Nicholas Butler Nov 16 '12 at 11:18
    
Where did you get the idea that immutable classes are the best way? I would imagine in a stateful multithreaded application that immutable classes could be a nightmare! –  Dan Puzey Nov 16 '12 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That code sample doesn't do anything except add overhead. C# String objects by themselves are thread-safe anyway and pointer read/writes are always atomic. That code sample would only make sense for a double or a struct.

You should not think about making individual properties thread-safe as much as making larger logical operations "atomic". For example if you have two field foo and bar and it must always be the case that bar == lowercase(foo) then you should protect operations which access any of them with the same lock.

A better example would be an object which must be contained in both a vector and a hash:

  • When adding you should lock both the vector and the hash and update both under the lock.
  • When querying you should lock the hash, fetch the value, unlock and return it.
  • When iterating you should either return a copy of the vector or make sure the caller understands your locking patterns.
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The problem with reference types is you're only locking getting the reference. After you have the reference to the type you can access the types members in an unsafe way, unless that type itself supported thread safety.

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