Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

A kinda of subjective issue I think. I have an action element and want to refer to it in the code for binding event I'm trying to choose between to ways of declaring such things:

1) the first option is more simple and straightforward in declaring and use:

<a class="play">Play</a>

('#menu .play').bind('click',...)

2) but the second option shows explicitly the purpose of the attribute

<a data-action="play">Play</a>

('#menu [data-action="play"]').bind('click',...)

Which should I choose (I'm not going to use selectors in CSS, only in JS code)?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're not using it for styles, I'd lean towards data-action="play" because it better describes the purpose (the action is play).
However, if you are planning on getting multiple elements like this and looping over them, I would either use class="play", because then you're treating them like a class of the same kind of thing again.. or use both, class for getting them and data-action to verify, can't go wrong there.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd err on the side of always using a class where possible despite a possible lack of semantism, simply because it's ~20% faster than an attribute selector: jsperf.com/id-selector-vs-attribute-selector/5 – Rory McCrossan Nov 16 '12 at 11:54
    
I agree that class selectors are faster than attribute selectors (unless maybe if you have a lot of classes on the same tags), but if you don't have thousands of tags in #menu, and you don't want to find them too often, I believe semantism can be a big plus. – TonioElGringo Nov 16 '12 at 12:00
    
Ok, thank you for your thoughts =) – WHITECOLOR Nov 16 '12 at 21:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.