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I have an object, it has a DateTime property... I want to pass that object from an .ashx handler back to a webpage via AJAX/JSON... I don't want to use 3rd party controls...

when I do this:

  new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(DateTime.Now);

I get this:

  "\/Date(1251385232334)\/"

but I want "8/26/2009" (nevermind localization... my app is very localized, so my date formatting assumptions are not up for debate in this question). If I make/register a custom converter

public class DateTimeConverter : JavaScriptConverter
{
    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
    {
        get { return new List<Type>() { typeof(DateTime), typeof(DateTime?) }; }
    }

    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        Dictionary<string, object> result = new Dictionary<string, object>();
        if (obj == null) return result;
        result["DateTime"] = ((DateTime)obj).ToShortDateString();
        return result;
    }

    public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        if (dictionary.ContainsKey("DateTime"))
            return new DateTime(long.Parse(dictionary["DateTime"].ToString()), DateTimeKind.Unspecified);
        return null;
    }
}

then I get this result (since the return value of the custom serialize method is a dictionary):

{"DateTime":"8/27/2009"}

so now in my Javascript, instead of doing

somePerson.Birthday

I have to do

somePerson.Birthday.DateTime 

  or

somePerson.Birthday["DateTime"]

how can I make the custom converter return a direct string so that I can have clean Javascript?

share|improve this question
3  
almost 5yrs later... and I would never use a date format of "8/27/2009" in JSON... I always use ISO8601: 2009-08-27T00:00:00Z –  Nick Franceschina Jan 10 at 19:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 12 down vote accepted

JavaScriptSerializer can definitely do what you desire.

It's possible to customize the serialization performed by JavaScriptSerializer for any type by creating a custom converter and registering it with the serializer. If you have a class called Person, we could create a converter like so:

public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public DateTime Birthday { get; set; }
}

public class PersonConverter : JavaScriptConverter
{
    private const string _dateFormat = "MM/dd/yyyy";

    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
    {
        get
        {
            return new[] { typeof(Person) };
        }
    }

    public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        Person p = new Person();
        foreach (string key in dictionary.Keys)
        {
            switch (key)
            {
                case "Name":
                    p.Name = (string)dictionary[key];
                    break;

                case "Birthday":
                    p.Birthday = DateTime.ParseExact(dictionary[key] as string, _dateFormat, DateTimeFormatInfo.InvariantInfo);
                    break;
            }
        }
        return p;
    }

    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        Person p = (Person)obj;
        IDictionary<string, object> serialized = new Dictionary<string, object>();
        serialized["Name"] = p.Name;
        serialized["Birthday"] = p.Birthday.ToString(_dateFormat);
        return serialized;
    }
}

And use it like this:

JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
serializer.RegisterConverters(new[] { new PersonConverter() });

Person p = new Person
            {
                Name = "User Name",
                Birthday = DateTime.Now
            };

string json = serializer.Serialize(p);
Console.WriteLine(json);
// {"Name":"User Name","Birthday":"12/20/2010"}

Person fromJson = serializer.Deserialize<Person>(json);
Console.WriteLine(String.Format("{0}, {1}", fromJson.Name, fromJson.Birthday)); 
// User Name, 12/20/2010 12:00:00 AM
share|improve this answer
    
hey look... an OLD question with an OLD answer. I've updated to accept yours –  Nick Franceschina Feb 12 '13 at 20:48

Here's an enhancement for the accepted answer.

Using generics, passing a type and using reflection to determine the datetime properties.

public class ExtendedJavaScriptConverter<T> : JavaScriptConverter where T : new()
{
    private const string _dateFormat = "dd/MM/yyyy";

    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
    {
        get
        {
            return new[] { typeof(T) };
        }
    }

    public override object Deserialize(IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        T p = new T();

        var props = typeof(T).GetProperties();

        foreach (string key in dictionary.Keys)
        {
            var prop = props.Where(t => t.Name == key).FirstOrDefault();
            if (prop != null)
            {
                if (prop.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime))
                {
                    prop.SetValue(p, DateTime.ParseExact(dictionary[key] as string, _dateFormat, DateTimeFormatInfo.InvariantInfo), null);

                }
                else
                {
                    prop.SetValue(p, dictionary[key], null);
                }
            }
        }                  

        return p;
    }      

    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        T p = (T)obj;
        IDictionary<string, object> serialized = new Dictionary<string, object>();

        foreach (PropertyInfo pi in typeof(T).GetProperties())
        {
            if (pi.PropertyType == typeof(DateTime))
            {
                serialized[pi.Name] = ((DateTime)pi.GetValue(p, null)).ToString(_dateFormat);
            }
            else
            {
                serialized[pi.Name] = pi.GetValue(p, null);
            }

        }

        return serialized;
    }

    public static JavaScriptSerializer GetSerializer() 
    {
        JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
        serializer.RegisterConverters(new[] { new ExtendedJavaScriptConverter<T>() });

        return serializer;
    }
}

Usage is simple:

 JavaScriptSerializer serialiser = ExtendedJavaScriptConverter<Task>.GetSerializer();

Hope that helps someone.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice implementation! –  Oybek Apr 28 '12 at 10:26

There is actually a nice clean way to do this without knowing the wrapper type or even needing a wrapper object.

You use JavaScriptConverter to convert your object to a Uri that also implements IDictionary. JavaScriptSerializer will serialize this as a string.

This hack is described here:

http://blog.calyptus.eu/seb/2011/12/custom-datetime-json-serialization/

share|improve this answer
    
Crazy, this worked! Thanks! –  Tengiz Feb 22 '12 at 21:41

Actually there is an ugly way, create a JavaScriptConverter for the container (Person/Article/Whatever) class

Container:

public class Article
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
}

Converter:

public class ArticleJavaScriptConverter : JavaScriptConverter
{
    public override IEnumerable<Type> SupportedTypes
    {
        get { return new Type[] { typeof(Article) }; }
    }

    public override object Deserialize(
        IDictionary<string, object> dictionary, 
        Type type, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        DateTime date = 
            DateTime.ParseExact(dictionary["date"] as string, "s", null);

        return
            new Article()
            {
                Id = (int)dictionary["id"],
                Title = dictionary["title"] as string,
                Date = date
            };
    }

    public override IDictionary<string, object> Serialize(
        object obj, JavaScriptSerializer serializer)
    {
        var article = obj as Article;
        var result = new Dictionary<string,object>();

        if (article != null)
        {
            this.SerializeInternal(article, result);
        }

        return result;
    }

    private void SerializeInternal(
        Article article, IDictionary<string, object> result)
    {
        result.Add("id", article.Id);
        result.Add("title", article.Title);
        result.Add("date", article.Date.ToString("s"));
    }
}

Happily ever after...

var serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();

serializer.RegisterConverters(
    new JavaScriptConverter[] {
        new ArticleJavaScriptConverter() 
    });

var expected = new Article()
{
    Id = 3,
    Title = "test",
    Date = DateTime.Now
};


// {"id":3,"title":"test","date":"2009-12-02T05:12:00"}
var json = serializer.Serialize(article);

var actual = serializer.Deserialize<Article>(json);

Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
share|improve this answer

the answer is: you can't use JavaScriptConverter this way... it doesn't have the capabilities.

but for reference:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/206384/how-to-format-json-date http://blog.stevenlevithan.com/archives/date-time-format

If you care, what I ended up doing was adding a method to the javascript string prototype to make this easier for me in code:

String.prototype.dateFromJSON = function () {
    return eval(this.replace(/\/Date\((\d+)\)\//gi, "new Date($1)"));
};

this is still painful to use in the meat of the code because you have to constantly call dateFromJSON() all over the place... which is dumb.

share|improve this answer

I realise this is a bit late for an answer but I recently came upon a really nice solution to this problem. It's documented in this blog post just in case anyone else finds it useful: http://icanmakethiswork.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/beg-steal-or-borrow-decent-javascript.html

share|improve this answer

I know this looks really dumb, but so far I haven't found anything better...I'm still looking though, so comments are welcome.

new JavaScriptSerializer().Serialize(DateTime.Now).Replace("\"\\/", "").Replace("\\/\"", "");

This just removes the quotes and slashes, so the output is just Date(123456789) which, though technically not a literal, is understood by the browser as an actual date value and not a string.

In JSON, it would look like this

{"myDate":Date(123456789)}

A hack, I suppose. If this is actually implemented in production code, I'd personally wrap it up, either in an extension method like FormatForDates() or wrap the serializer itself as in a decorator pattern...or in this case, an "undecorator." I must really be missing the boat as to why this seems so hard. I just want to render a date, people! :-p

share|improve this answer
    
I used a regex to get a similar result: new Regex(@"{""DateTime"":(""[0-9/-]+"")}").Replace(s, "$1"). The esult looks like {"myDate":"5/3/2011"}. –  Ryan May 3 '11 at 17:32

link text This example works

JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
DateTime dt1 = dt;

string jsonDateNow = serializer.Serialize(dt1);
share|improve this answer
    
that example most definitely does not work... it's exactly the same as what I listed at the top of my post... so it just outputs "\/Date(1251467694063)\/" which is not what I want. but thanks 4 the link to the other similar thread –  Nick Franceschina Aug 28 '09 at 13:59
    
This example works for me perfectly, the curious thing is that if I did not create variable "dt1" serialized wrong. –  andres descalzo Aug 28 '09 at 16:14
    
when you run that code, what do you get as output? –  Nick Franceschina Aug 28 '09 at 17:47

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