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I need to speed up a couple of queries on a SQL Server.

Thank you for any help.

The first one takes about 30-45 seconds on the live DB and the second one takes 90 seconds.

In case you are wondering I work for a hospital hence the category names and we have a very large DB

select Status, StatusChoice, Category, VisitID, 
     OrderedProcedureName, OrderDateTime, ServiceDateTime 
from OeOrders 
where Category IN 'RAD' 
    and StatusChoice = 'S'

.

select Status, StatusChoice, Category, VisitID, 
     OrderedProcedureName, OrderDateTime, ServiceDateTime 
from OeOrders 
where Category IN ('RAD','CT','US','MRI') 
    and StatusChoice = 'S'
share|improve this question
5  
Does the Category field have a clustered index? Or any index? – prprcupofcoffee Nov 16 '12 at 14:22
4  
What indexes do you have on the table? What do the query plans look like? I suggest watching How to Make SELECT Statements Faster. – Oded Nov 16 '12 at 14:23
    
What is the size of the result set you expect in each case? How is the query called (could you set this up so they are the same query, just with a different table-value parameter in the like condition? – Joel Coehoorn Nov 16 '12 at 14:28

You could try improving your SELECT performance by creating an index on the table; it could make a little worst performance for non-query command (eg.UPDATE,INSERT,DELETE), as SQL has to update his index too, but feel free to experiment this.

Run this script once, then check again the delay in seconds:

CREATE INDEX iCategoryChoiche ON OeOrders 
(StatusChoice,Category) INCLUDE (Status, StatusChoice, Category, VisitID, OrderedProcedureName, OrderDateTime, ServiceDateTime)
share|improve this answer
    
Depends on how selective Category and StatusChoice are. But I don't think "a novice" ought to be creating indexes on a hospital's live database:) – Lord Peter Nov 16 '12 at 14:42
1  
You're right, @LordPeter. But how to answer his question? I can't find another way of speed up its process. Maybe he can optimize the data-types, or shrink the table size, or do some backup/remove of old records. IMHO all of these are things that a "novice" ought to do even less than a index creation :) – LittleSweetSeas Nov 16 '12 at 14:45

Well I can say that in the first SQL you can use = instead of IN, I'm sure it's faster.

select Status, StatusChoice, Category, VisitID, OrderedProcedureName, OrderDateTime, ServiceDateTime from OeOrders where Category='RAD' and StatusChoice = 'S'

Also take a look at these, it might help: http://hungred.com/useful-information/ways-optimize-sql-queries/

share|improve this answer
2  
Often there is no difference... the optimizer will see you only have one item and make the switch to an equality comparison automatically. – Joel Coehoorn Nov 16 '12 at 14:29
    
In (x, y, z) just gets treated as =x or =y or =z anyway so for one item they will be equivalent. – Martin Smith Nov 16 '12 at 14:33

You may try to enforce StatusChoice filtering in first place by placing subquery in FROM:

select src.*
from (
select Status, StatusChoice, Category, VisitID, 
     OrderedProcedureName, OrderDateTime, ServiceDateTime 
from OeOrders 
where StatusChoice = 'S'
) src
where src.Category IN ('RAD','CT','US','MRI') 

But improvement chance is rather small - DBMS is probably executing query in this way already. Reasoning for this rewerite is that "IN" with multiple values often translates to filtering with "or" predicates, which are rather slow in SQL, so maybe smaller set of rows to be "or'ed" will be returned faster.

Query is very simple so you rather have to review execution plan. From execution plan you will know, which indexes could use reorganizing, as well as which statistics should be updated (or maybe created new). Surely, a new index on (StatusChoice,Category) will help, if it's not present yet.

If you don't care about getting some "dirty" results, you may also use (NOLOCK) hint.

share|improve this answer
1  
there is no guarantee that order will be as in your query, sql server might decide to use different execution plan, to force order you need to add OPTION(FORCE ORDER) to the end. – Farfarak Nov 16 '12 at 15:09
    
good point, I have edited the answer – pkmiec Nov 16 '12 at 15:55
    
FORCE ORDER won't make any difference anyway. That forces the order of joins. There aren't any in this query. – Martin Smith Nov 16 '12 at 15:57
    
MSDN confirms Martin comment, so I rollback 'force order' edit... – pkmiec Nov 16 '12 at 16:11

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