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I use the following XPATH Query to list the object under a site. ListObject[@Title='SomeValue']. SomeValue is dynamic. This query works as long as SomeValue does not have an apostrophe ('). Tried using escape sequence also. Didn't work.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
so is SomeValue a C# variable? –  Jon W Aug 27 '09 at 15:36
    
Yes. It is a C# Variable."ListObject[@Title='" + SomeValue +"']". This is how I have written the expression –  Prabhu Sep 9 '09 at 12:12

9 Answers 9

up vote 41 down vote accepted

This is surprisingly difficult to do.

Take a look at theXPath Recommendation, and you'll see that it defines a literal as:

Literal ::=   '"' [^"]* '"' 
            | "'" [^']* "'"

Which is to say, string literals in XPath expressions can contain apostrophes or double quotes but not both.

You can't use escaping to get around this. A literal like this:

'Some'Value'

will match this XML text:

Some'Value

This does mean that it's possible for there to be a piece of XML text that you can't generate an XPath literal to match, e.g.:

<elm att="&quot;&apos"/>

But that doesn't mean it's impossible to match that text with XPath, it's just tricky. In any case where the value you're trying to match contains both single and double quotes, you can construct an expression that uses concat to produce the text that it's going to match:

elm[@att=concat('"', "'")]

So that leads us to this, which is a lot more complicated than I'd like it to be:

/// <summary>
/// Produce an XPath literal equal to the value if possible; if not, produce
/// an XPath expression that will match the value.
/// 
/// Note that this function will produce very long XPath expressions if a value
/// contains a long run of double quotes.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="value">The value to match.</param>
/// <returns>If the value contains only single or double quotes, an XPath
/// literal equal to the value.  If it contains both, an XPath expression,
/// using concat(), that evaluates to the value.</returns>
static string XPathLiteral(string value)
{
    // if the value contains only single or double quotes, construct
    // an XPath literal
    if (!value.Contains("\""))
    {
        return "\"" + value + "\"";
    }
    if (!value.Contains("'"))
    {
        return "'" + value + "'";
    }

    // if the value contains both single and double quotes, construct an
    // expression that concatenates all non-double-quote substrings with
    // the quotes, e.g.:
    //
    //    concat("foo", '"', "bar")
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.Append("concat(");
    string[] substrings = value.Split('\"');
    for (int i = 0; i < substrings.Length; i++ )
    {
        bool needComma = (i>0);
        if (substrings[i] != "")
        {
            if (i > 0)
            {
                sb.Append(", ");
            }
            sb.Append("\"");
            sb.Append(substrings[i]);
            sb.Append("\"");
            needComma = true;
        }
        if (i < substrings.Length - 1)
        {
            if (needComma)
            {
                sb.Append(", ");                    
            }
            sb.Append("'\"'");
        }

    }
    sb.Append(")");
    return sb.ToString();
}

And yes, I tested it with all the edge cases. That's why the logic is so stupidly complex:

    foreach (string s in new[]
    {
        "foo",              // no quotes
        "\"foo",            // double quotes only
        "'foo",             // single quotes only
        "'foo\"bar",        // both; double quotes in mid-string
        "'foo\"bar\"baz",   // multiple double quotes in mid-string
        "'foo\"",           // string ends with double quotes
        "'foo\"\"",         // string ends with run of double quotes
        "\"'foo",           // string begins with double quotes
        "\"\"'foo",         // string begins with run of double quotes
        "'foo\"\"bar"       // run of double quotes in mid-string
    })
    {
        Console.Write(s);
        Console.Write(" = ");
        Console.WriteLine(XPathLiteral(s));
        XmlElement elm = d.CreateElement("test");
        d.DocumentElement.AppendChild(elm);
        elm.SetAttribute("value", s);

        string xpath = "/root/test[@value = " + XPathLiteral(s) + "]";
        if (d.SelectSingleNode(xpath) == elm)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("OK");
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Should have found a match for {0}, and didn't.", s);
        }
    }
    Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Excellent work, thanks Rob. I'll copy that for my code if you don't mind. :-) –  Christian Hayter Sep 1 '09 at 10:36
7  
Please do. I actually have no use for it myself; I only did this because at first I found the problem interesting and then as I dug in its difficulty started to annoy me. My ADHD is your gain. –  Robert Rossney Sep 1 '09 at 22:07
    
How is about "\n"? I have doubt new lines could cause problems too. –  kan Mar 24 '11 at 23:46
    
@kan no, it's perfectly fine for a string literal in XPath to contain a newline character. The only restriction is that single quoted literals can't contain single quotes and double quoted literals can't contain double quotes. –  Ian Roberts Apr 22 at 15:33

EDIT: After a heavy unit testing session, and checking the XPath Standards, I have revised my function as follows:

public static string ToXPath(string value) {

    const string apostrophe = "'";
    const string quote = "\"";

    if(value.Contains(quote)) {
        if(value.Contains(apostrophe)) {
            throw new XPathException("Illegal XPath string literal.");
        } else {
            return apostrophe + value + apostrophe;
        }
    } else {
        return quote + value + quote;
    }
}

It appears that XPath doesn't have a character escaping system at all, it's quite primitive really. Evidently my original code only worked by coincidence. My apologies for misleading anyone!

Original answer below for reference only - please ignore

For safety, make sure that any occurrence of all 5 predefined XML entities in your XPath string are escaped, e.g.

public static string ToXPath(string value) {
    return "'" + XmlEncode(value) + "'";
}

public static string XmlEncode(string value) {
    StringBuilder text = new StringBuilder(value);
    text.Replace("&", "&amp;");
    text.Replace("'", "&apos;");
    text.Replace(@"""", "&quot;");
    text.Replace("<", "&lt;");
    text.Replace(">", "&gt;");
    return text.ToString();
}

I have done this before and it works fine. If it doesn't work for you, maybe there is some additional context to the problem that you need to make us aware of.

share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't even have to treat XML as a plain string. Things like escaping and unescaping are abstracted away for you by the built-in XML libraries. You're reinventing the wheel here. –  Welbog Aug 27 '09 at 16:06
4  
If you could point me to a BCL class that abstracts away the process of building an XPath query string, I would gladly ditch these functions. –  Christian Hayter Aug 27 '09 at 16:43

I ported Robert's answer to Java (tested in 1.6):

/// <summary>
/// Produce an XPath literal equal to the value if possible; if not, produce
/// an XPath expression that will match the value.
///
/// Note that this function will produce very long XPath expressions if a value
/// contains a long run of double quotes.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="value">The value to match.</param>
/// <returns>If the value contains only single or double quotes, an XPath
/// literal equal to the value.  If it contains both, an XPath expression,
/// using concat(), that evaluates to the value.</returns>
public static String XPathLiteral(String value) {
    if(!value.contains("\"") && !value.contains("'")) {
        return "'" + value + "'";
    }
    // if the value contains only single or double quotes, construct
    // an XPath literal
    if (!value.contains("\"")) {
        System.out.println("Doesn't contain Quotes");
        String s = "\"" + value + "\"";
        System.out.println(s);
        return s;
    }
    if (!value.contains("'")) {
        System.out.println("Doesn't contain apostophes");
        String s =  "'" + value + "'";
        System.out.println(s);
        return s;
    }

    // if the value contains both single and double quotes, construct an
    // expression that concatenates all non-double-quote substrings with
    // the quotes, e.g.:
    //
    //    concat("foo", '"', "bar")
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    sb.append("concat(");
    String[] substrings = value.split("\"");
    for (int i = 0; i < substrings.length; i++) {
        boolean needComma = (i > 0);
        if (!substrings[i].equals("")) {
            if (i > 0) {
                sb.append(", ");
            }
            sb.append("\"");
            sb.append(substrings[i]);
            sb.append("\"");
            needComma = true;
        }
        if (i < substrings.length - 1) {
            if (needComma) {
                sb.append(", ");
            }
            sb.append("'\"'");
        }
        System.out.println("Step " + i + ": " + sb.toString());
    }
    //This stuff is because Java is being stupid about splitting strings
    if(value.endsWith("\"")) {
        sb.append(", '\"'");
    }
    //The code works if the string ends in a apos
    /*else if(value.endsWith("'")) {
        sb.append(", \"'\"");
    }*/
    sb.append(")");
    String s = sb.toString();
    System.out.println(s);
    return s;
}

Hope this helps somebody!

share|improve this answer

Here is an alternative to Robert Rossney's StringBuilder approach, perhaps more intuitive:

    /// <summary>
    /// Produce an XPath literal equal to the value if possible; if not, produce
    /// an XPath expression that will match the value.
    /// 
    /// Note that this function will produce very long XPath expressions if a value
    /// contains a long run of double quotes.
    /// 
    /// From: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1341847/special-character-in-xpath-query
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">The value to match.</param>
    /// <returns>If the value contains only single or double quotes, an XPath
    /// literal equal to the value.  If it contains both, an XPath expression,
    /// using concat(), that evaluates to the value.</returns>
    public static string XPathLiteral(string value)
    {
        // If the value contains only single or double quotes, construct
        // an XPath literal
        if (!value.Contains("\""))
            return "\"" + value + "\"";

        if (!value.Contains("'"))
            return "'" + value + "'";

        // If the value contains both single and double quotes, construct an
        // expression that concatenates all non-double-quote substrings with
        // the quotes, e.g.:
        //
        //    concat("foo",'"',"bar")

        List<string> parts = new List<string>();

        // First, put a '"' after each component in the string.
        foreach (var str in value.Split('"'))
        {
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(str))
                parts.Add('"' + str + '"'); // (edited -- thanks Daniel :-)

            parts.Add("'\"'");
        }

        // Then remove the extra '"' after the last component.
        parts.RemoveAt(parts.Count - 1);

        // Finally, put it together into a concat() function call.
        return "concat(" + string.Join(",", parts) + ")";
    }
share|improve this answer
    
fyi yours does not pass all of his tests. –  Daniel A. White Apr 16 '13 at 12:53
    
change your add to the parts to quote the string. –  Daniel A. White Apr 16 '13 at 12:54
    
Thanks, not sure how I missed that. Fixed. :-) –  Jonathan Gilbert May 9 '13 at 21:28
    
Hello Your code is 1000 times better than the original but still more clumsy than required. Instead of first adding a string which you later remove it would be easier: String[] split = value.Split('"'); for (int i=0; i<split.length; i++) { if (i>0) parts.Add("'\"'"); if (split[i].Length > 0) parts.Add('"' + split[i] + '"'); } –  Elmue Feb 1 at 1:59
    
@Elmue That's a matter of personal taste, I suppose. I find that clunkier than removing the final string. There's no significant difference in performance, of course. Another way to implement it might be to add a '"' before each entry, and then use an inline LINQ expression instead of having a separate .Remove statement: foreach (var str in value.Split('"')) { parts.Add("'\"'"); if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(str)) parts.Add('"' + str + '"'); } return "concat(" + string.Join(",", parts.Skip(1)) + ")"; –  Jonathan Gilbert Feb 4 at 17:59

You can quote an XPath string by using search and replace.

In F#

let quoteString (s : string) =
    if      not (s.Contains "'" ) then sprintf "'%s'"   s
    else if not (s.Contains "\"") then sprintf "\"%s\"" s
    else "concat('" + s.Replace ("'", "', \"'\", '") + "')"

I haven't tested it extensively, but seems to work.

share|improve this answer

If you're not going to have any double-quotes in SomeValue, you can use escaped double-quotes to specify the value you're searching for in your XPath search string.

ListObject[@Title=\"SomeValue\"]
share|improve this answer
    
That's not how you escape characters in XML. –  Welbog Aug 27 '09 at 16:06
2  
That's true. But an XPath query isn't XML text, and at any rate he's not escaping the quotation marks for XPath anyway, he's escaping them for C#. The actual, literal XPath is ListObject[@Title="SomeValue"] –  Robert Rossney Aug 29 '09 at 21:24
    
You did not understand the quesion. The XPath syntax does NOT allow the backslash character for escaping. –  Elmue Feb 1 at 2:09

By far the best approach to this problem is to use the facilities provided by your XPath library to declare an XPath-level variable that you can reference in the expression. The variable value can then be any string in the host programming language, and isn't subject to the restrictions of XPath string literals. For example, in Java with javax.xml.xpath:

XPathFactory xpf = XPathFactory.newInstance();
final Map<String, Object> variables = new HashMap<>();
xpf.setXPathVariableResolver(new XPathVariableResolver() {
  public Object resolveVariable(QName name) {
    return variables.get(name.getLocalPart());
  }
});

XPath xpath = xpf.newXPath();
XPathExpression expr = xpath.compile("ListObject[@Title=$val]");
variables.put("val", someValue);
NodeList nodes = (NodeList)expr.evaluate(someNode, XPathConstants.NODESET);

For C# XPathNavigator you would define a custom XsltContext as described in this MSDN article (you'd only need the variable-related parts of this example, not the extension functions).

share|improve this answer

You can fix this issue by using double quotes instead of single quotes in the XPath expression.

For ex:

element.XPathSelectElements(String.Format("//group[@title=\"{0}\"]", "Man's"));
share|improve this answer

I had this problem a while back and seemingly the simplest, but not the fastest solution is that you add a new node into the XML document that has an attribute with the value 'SomeValue', then look for that attribute value using a simple xpath search. After the you're finished with the operation, you can delete the "temporary node" from the XML document.

This way, the whole comparison happens "inside", so you don't have to construct the weird XPath query.

I seem to remember that in order to speed things up, you should be adding the temp value to the root node.

Good luck...

share|improve this answer
    
BTW, this solution might solve your problem, too, that pretty much states the same thing as you do: stackoverflow.com/questions/642125/… –  Gyuri Nov 24 '09 at 1:08
    
You did not understand the question. –  Elmue Feb 1 at 2:07
    
Please explain... –  Gyuri Feb 3 at 23:57

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