Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is hard to explain without some sort of example so I'm sorry for the weird title.

I have a JSON object full of data. Some of this data is related, but it's all in a single object, not nested. The only way to tell if an object is nested is by looking at the ID field.

Example ID's:

[0] => Item_1
[1] => Item_1.Item_1a
[2] => Item_1.Item_1a.Item_1b
[3] => Item_2
[4] => Item_2.Item_2a
[5] => Item_3


// 0 is a root item
// 1 would belong to 0
// 2 would belong to 1
// 3 is a root item
// 4 would belong to 3
// 5 is a root item

What I want to end up with is

[0] => Item_1->subAttributes = [0] => Item_1a, [1] => Item 1b
[1] => Item_2->subAttributes = [0] => Item_2a
[2] => Item_3 // Since it has no sub attributes I want to remove it.

I've tried a few different ways, and I can easily nest one level, but more than one and I get lost.

I've tried looping through the attributes, splitting the ID by . and then looping over the ID parts to sort them, but I am stuck. I'm trying to do this in JS.

This is everything I've tried so far...some is commented out because it wasn't working properly and I tried a different direction.

function getNestedAttributes(attrs)
{
    var nested = [],
        nestedTmp = 0,
        subAttributes = [],
        currIndex = 0;
        subIndex = 0;

    for ( var i=0; i<attrs.length; i++ )
    {
        // splitId returns an array of elements split by .
        var idLevels = splitId(attrs[i].id),
            flag = false,
            tempObj = {};

        for ( var n=0; n<idLevels.length; n++ )
        {
            // console.log(attrs[i]);

            // array_key_exists is a JS function made to mimic php's array_key_exists
            if ( ! array_key_exists(idLevels[n], nested) )
            {
                // console.log(idLevels[n], 'is new');
                if ( ! flag )
                {
                    console.log(idLevels[n], attrs[i].name);
                    nested[idLevels[n]] = attrs[i];
                }
                else
                {
                    // console.log('FLAG!', idLevels[n], attrs[i].name);
                    console.log(nested[flag]);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                // console.log(idLevels[n], 'is not new');
                flag = idLevels[n];
            }
        }

        // if ( idLevels.length == 1 )
        // {
        //  // Parent Item
        //  currIndex = nested.push(attrs[i]);
        //  subAttributes = [];
        // }
        // else
        // {
        //  if ( idLevels.length > 2 )
        //  {
        //      // nestedTmp = nested[currIndex-1][subIndex];
        //      // subAttributes.push(attrs[i]);
        //      console.log(attrs[i].name);
        //  }
        //  else
        //  {
        //      nestedTmp = nested[currIndex-1];
        //      // subAttributes.push(attrs[i]);
        //  }

        //  subAttributes.push(attrs[i]);
        // }

        // // nested[currIndex-1].subAttributes = subAttributes;
        // nestedTmp.subAttributes = subAttributes;
    }

    //console.log(nested);
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you considered making the data format a more reasonable one instead of trying to hack this messy format into something usable? JSON for example. –  Jani Hartikainen Nov 16 '12 at 14:46
    
Unfortunately I do not control the data. That would definitely be my first option. –  Seth Nov 16 '12 at 14:54
    
This is an array of JSON objects. Each object has a key called ID that is named Item_1, Item_1.Item_1a, etc. So I'm trying to sort through it and nest them. –  Seth Nov 16 '12 at 15:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.