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I am trying to translate the C code below to MIPS assembly language, I kind of understand most of it however, I am lost as to what the equivalent of the first line is in assembly...

int ary[3] = {2,3,4};

I'd appreciate it if someone can take a look at my C to assembly 'translation' and verify I am on the right track.

C Code

int ary[3] = {2,3,4};
int i=0;

//loop to double array values
for(i=0; i < 3; i++){
    ary[i] = ary[i]*2;
}

What I tried:

add $t0, $s0, $zero #get base address of the array 'ary' (dont understand this part)
addi $t1, baseAddress, 8 #cut off point to stop the loop; array[2]
addi $t1, $zero, $zero #initialize i=0


Start:
lw $t2, base(offset)
sll $t2, $t0, 1 #mutiply $t2 by 2  
sw $t2, base(offset)
addi $t0, $t0, 4 # Increment the address to the next element
bne $t0, $t1, Start # $t0 will keep increasing until reaches stopping point $t1
Exit:
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If that's a local array, you allocate space for it on the stack, then initialize it from code. A possible asm translation of the C code may look like:

    addi $sp, $sp, -12     # allocate space for 3 words, $sp is now the address of the array
    addi $t0, $zero, 2
    sw $t0, ($sp)          # ary[0]=2
    addi $t0, $zero, 3
    sw $t0, 4($sp)         # ary[1]=3
    addi $t0, $zero, 4
    sw $t0, 8($sp)         # ary[2]=4

    addi $t0, $zero, 0     # initialize i=0

Start:
    sll $t1, $t0, 2        # i*4 for element size
    add $t1, $t1, $sp      # add base address of array, $t1 is now &ary[i]
    lw $t2, ($t1)          # load ary[i]
    sll $t2, $t2, 1        # mutiply by 2
    sw $t2, ($t1)          # store back to ary[i]
    addi $t0, $t0, 1       # i++
    addi $t1, $t0, -3      # check if i<3 by doing (i-3)<0
    bltz $t1, Start
    addi $sp, $sp, 12      # free the array

Your asm code was taking a slightly different approach, the C version would have looked like:

int* end = &ary[3];
for(int* ptr = ary; ptr != end; ptr++)
{
    *ptr = *ptr * 2;
}

And the fixed asm version for that is:

    addi $t1, $sp, 12      # end=&ary[3]
    addi $t0, $sp, 0       # ptr=ary

Start:
    lw $t2, ($t0)          # load ary[i]
    sll $t2, $t2, 1        # mutiply by 2
    sw $t2, ($t0)          # store back to ary[i]
    addi $t0, $t0, 4       # ptr++ (note it is incremented by 4 due to element size)
    bne $t0, $t1, Start    # ptr!=end
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, thank you for the reply, I appreciate it. I was wondering why there isn't an end statement. Also, why isn't there a base address in the lw and sw instructions? – AnchovyLegend Nov 16 '12 at 21:11
1  
Not sure what end statement you are talking about, maybe a jr $ra? Since your C code was not a complete function or a program, I just provided the asm code in a similar fashion. As to the missing base address: that's because the address has already been calculated by adding $sp (the array address), so the base is just 0. You can write that out if you want. Note that the base can not be another register, lw $t2, $sp($t1) is illegal. – Jester Nov 16 '12 at 23:21
    
I appreciate this :) thank you! – AnchovyLegend Nov 17 '12 at 13:59

There are many errors in your code

addi $t1, baseAddress, 8 #cut off point to stop the loop; array[2]
addi $t1, $zero, $zero #initialize i=0

In the first line, there's no instruction like this unless baseAddress is a register. The second line should be an add, not addi because $zero is not an immediate

Start:
lw $t2, base(offset)
sll $t2, $t0, 1 #mutiply $t2 by 2  
sw $t2, base(offset)

The above lines have problem too. You've just load a word to $t2 and then immidiately store another value to $t2, so the previous load is meaningless

share|improve this answer
  #include <iostream>
  using namespace std;

  //prototypes

  int maxIs (int *x, int n);
  int minIs ( int *x, int n);
  void avgIs (int *x, int n, int *theAvg, int *theRem);

  int main(void)
  {
  int n = 8;
  int x[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8};
  int theMax, theMin, theAvg, theRem;

  theMax = maxIs(x,n);
  theMin = minIs(x,n);
  avgIs(x,n,&theAvg, &theRem);

  cout << "max = " << theMax << "\n";
  cout << "min = " << theMin << "\n";
  cout << "avg = " << theAvg << " " << theRem << "/" << n << "\n";
  cout << "Bye!\n";
  }

  //functions

 int maxIs (int *x, int n )
 {
int i;
int theMax = 0;
for (i=0; i<n; i++)
{
    if (x[i]>theMax) theMax =x[i];
}
return (theMax);
}

int minIs (int *x, int n )
{
int i;
int theMin = 0x7FFF;
for (i=0; i<n; i++)
{
    if (x[i]>theMin) theMin =x[i];
}
return (theMin);
}

void avgIs (int *x, int n, int *theAvg, int *theRem )
{
int i;
int theSum = 0;
for (i=0; i<n; i++)
{
    theSum += x[i];
}
*theAvg = theSum /n;
*theRem = theSum %n;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Please add some explanation to your code-only answer... – Werner Apr 18 '14 at 20:40
    
Did you post this in the wrong place? This has nothing to do with and doesn't answer the question. – Blastfurnace Apr 22 '14 at 4:10

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