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I'm a C# newbie, so please bear with me.

OK, so I have two classes in different assemblies that need to reference each other:

namespace AssemblyA
{
  class A 
  {
    private B MyB { get; set; }
  }
}

namespace AssemblyB
{
  class B
  {
    private A MyA { get; set; }
  }
}

I understand that circular references aren't allowed, so I'm using an interface:

namespace AssemblyA
{
  public interface IB
  {
     // whatever 'A' needs of 'B'
  }

  class A 
  {
    private IB MyB { get; set; }
  }
}

namespace AssemblyB
{
  class B : AssemblyA.IB
  {
    private A MyA { get; set; }
  }
}

This works, but it has the disadvantage that it exposes IB to the rest of the world. What I would like to do instead is to make IB internal. But then B cannot derive from it.

In C++, I'd make B a friend and be done. I understand that C# doesn't have friends (pun not intended, but noted), so I have to make do without. I've read that there is an attribute for that, but this will make the whole of assembly A accessible to the whole of assembly B, which I don't like. Is there a way to avoid that?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It seems that the big issue here is letting assembly B see one specific member of assembly A.

This negates, according to the comments reiterating part of the original question, the feasibility of using the well-documented InternalsVisibleTo attribute.

Or does it?

Have you considered making a new assembly, C, with the IB interface marked internal and its own InternalsVisibleTo attributes out to A and B?

This at least exposes IB in a controlled fashion, without exposing all of A to B. I'm not a huge fan of the solution (I would personally just go ahead and use InternalsVisibleTo on A as has been suggested, then document the rest of my internals to keep others in line), but I understand where you're coming from -- and this at least solves the problem.

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John, I have considered this. It seems lame to me having to add an assembly just to circumvent this syntactic problem. Anyway, since you're the first who actually read my question and make a suggestion, I have voted this up. –  sbi Aug 27 '09 at 16:07
    
I would still ask -- who's building B and why is it so critical that, if they can access this one piece, they not access the others? Nothing happens by default; the developer/s in question would need to manually call those members. (In other words, I agree with the other answers more than my own! :) ) –  John Rudy Aug 27 '09 at 16:09
    
Both assemblies are in-house. But I don't that matters much. Over the years, I have learned that encapsulation is a virtue. I like to tighten everything as fast as possible at compile time. I don't consider the above design something unusual and I'm surprised this isn't possible to get this tight in C#. –  sbi Aug 27 '09 at 16:15
1  
C# is designed to use assemblies as one of the primary accessibility partitions. While it's truly unanswerable as to why Heljsberg & his team made all the decisions they did, I think they considered this level of granularity an edge case, and felt that assembly boundaries -- and breaking these types of members into new assemblies -- was an appropriate response instead of the potentially increased language and runtime complexity. –  John Rudy Aug 27 '09 at 16:22
    
@John: I guess there's no way around this then. Thanks for your explanations. I'll try to wrap my head around this concept. –  sbi Aug 27 '09 at 16:31

You've in fact been misinformed - C#/.NET does indeed have support for friend assemblies. You want to mark your two assemblies as Friend Assemblies, which MSDN defines as the following:

An internal type or internal member in an assembly can be accessed from another assembly.

So, simply place the following attribute anywhere in one of your code files in your project (I would choose AssemblyInfo.cs).

[assembly:InternalsVisibleTo("name_of_friend_assembly")]
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2  
@sbi: Yeah, there's no way you'll get around having all internal members visible to the whole of the other assembly. Why isn't this appropiate for you, however? Surely if you want to do this sort of thing, these assemblies can trust each other, by definition? –  Noldorin Aug 27 '09 at 15:43
    
@sbi: Because you're writing both assemblies? .NET tries to help you out, but it can only do so much to prevent developer stupidity. –  Noldorin Aug 27 '09 at 15:51
1  
It seems to me that you are going too far with "more encapsulation". Why not just make IB public ? –  Petar Repac Aug 27 '09 at 16:39
1  
@sbi: Right. So the comment in your original question is not only incorrect (it implies everything is public/internal, neglecting private/protected), but you managed to tack it on a sentence at the end, doing your best to make people miss it. :) Even so, my follow-up comments discussing the point should have completed the answer. Your stubbornness seems beyond resolve though. Oh, and insulting whoever's trying to answer your question isn't generally a good tactic. It might be wise to behave civilly if you want this site to remain accessible. –  Noldorin Aug 27 '09 at 16:52
1  
@sbi: No, I was referring to consumers of your library in relation to "developer stupidity". Don't get so hung up about not being on the Unanswered view. Calm down, and show a bit more respect to users here. –  Noldorin Aug 27 '09 at 17:31

You could use InternalsVisibleToAttribute

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.runtime.compilerservices.internalsvisibletoattribute.aspx

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<sigh> "I've read that there is an attribute for that, but this will make the whole of assembly A accessible to the whole of assembly B, which I don't like." –  sbi Aug 27 '09 at 15:44
1  
+1 to counter the pointless down-vote. –  Noldorin Aug 27 '09 at 15:52
    
@Noldorin: Go back and read my actual question. Then read this (and your) answer. Then think. Then vote again. –  sbi Aug 27 '09 at 16:05

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