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I have created an office add-in that holds an instance of a WPF Application. When the user clicks buttons on the add-in, I launch different windows by doing the following:

MyViewModel viewModel = new MyViewModel(string infoFromOffice);
MyWindow view = new MyWindow();
view.DataContext = viewModel;

wpfApp.Run(view);

In constructing view models before my call to wpfApp.Run() I hit probelms with the current SynchronizationContext later on. The answer here explains why. Is there a better way of launching WPF windows from an office add-in?

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Out of curiosity, does it make any difference to call wpfApp.Run(new MyWindow { DataContext = new MyViewModel(infoFromOffice) }); –  Jay Nov 16 '12 at 16:20
    
Thanks for the suggestion, unfortunately this does not work. –  Matt Nov 16 '12 at 16:57
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3 Answers

I've never created an Office add-in, but I have used WPF windows in other kinds of non-WPF applications (Windows Forms, libraries to generate .XPS files from WPF visuals, etc). You could try the approach I suggested in this question.. It shows how to configure a thread so it will be able to run the WPF app. If you take a look on the generated app's code ("App.g.i.cs") of a WPF app, it seems it is started like this:

/// <summary>
    /// Application Entry Point.
    /// </summary>
    [System.STAThreadAttribute()]
    [System.Diagnostics.DebuggerNonUserCodeAttribute()]
    public static void Main() {
        WpfApplication1.App app = new WpfApplication1.App();
        app.InitializeComponent();
        app.Run();
    }

I tried launching an app from a unit test with the following code and it worked well:

[TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod()
    {
        // The dispatcher thread
        var t = new Thread(() =>
        {
            var app = new App();
            // Corrects the error "System.IO.IOException: Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() returns null..."
            App.ResourceAssembly = app.GetType().Assembly;
            app.InitializeComponent();

            app.Run();
        });

        // Configure the thread
        t.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
        t.Start();
        t.Join();
    }

EDIT

Looking at your code I believe that the statement sensible to the SynchronizationContext is the creation of the Window instance, not the creation of your ViewModel (unless your ViewModel deals with View logic and instantiates controls, something it shouldn't be doing). So you can try to move the instantiation of the Window to the thread of the App. Something like this:

[TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod3()
    {
        // Creates the viewmodel with the necessary infomation wherever 
                    // you need to.
        MyViewModel viewModel = new MyViewModel(string infoFromOffice);

        // The dispatcher thread
        var t = new Thread(() =>
        {
            var app = new App();
            // Corrects the error "System.IO.IOException: Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() returns null..."
            App.ResourceAssembly = app.GetType().Assembly;
            app.InitializeComponent();

            // Creates the Window in the App's Thread and pass the information to it
            MyWindow view = new MyWindow();
            view.DataContext = viewModel;

            app.Run(view);
        });

        // Configure the thread
        t.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
        t.Start();
        t.Join();
    }
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Thanks, this is a useful example but doesn't solve the problem. Here the view models are created after the call to app.Run(). Because I need to pass my view model some information it must be instantiated before the call to app.Run(). This means that during the construction of the view model, there is no dispatcher, which is causing problems namely with getting SynchronizationContext.Current. –  Matt Nov 19 '12 at 9:57
    
I believe the problem is with the intantiation of the Window. See the edited answer. –  Arthur Nunes Nov 19 '12 at 15:04
    
"unless your ViewModel deals with View logic and instantiates controls, something it shouldn't be doing". I think this is the key here. My program uses background threads (tasks) to query a database and then update the UI via the UI thread. If I use one of these tasks in the view model constructor (before the call to app.Run()) it fails because SynchronizationContext.Current is null. I suppose the fix is just to not perform a database query in the view model constructor. Thanks for helping me with this. –  Matt Nov 20 '12 at 9:22
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

While Arthur's answer helped point to why the problem was happening, it did not actually answer how to pass data to a view model from a host application while still having the view model constructor call be after the call to App.Run(). I have since found a (very simple) solution! For anyone who is interested.

In App.xaml.cs:

private string data;

public App(string infoFromOffice) {
    this.data = data;
}

protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e) {
    base.OnStartup(e);

    MyViewModel viewwModel = new MyViewModel(this.data);
    MyWindow view = new MyWindow();
    view.Show();
}

When launching the app:

App application = new App(infoFromOffice);
application.Run();

Note that the startup URI needs to be removed in App.xaml. This very simple solution allows me to pass information to my app, but at the same time does not require that the view model be constructed in a "non WPF environment" and so can make use of the Dispatcher etc.

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Here is a version using application domain to open the wpf application multiple times under separate application domains and UI thread. Used this in an office addin. Each time startup is called you get a new application. Have not verified how well the threads shutdown when the wpf app is closed.

http://eprystupa.wordpress.com/2008/07/31/running-multiple-wpf-applications-in-the-same-process-using-appdomains/

public class WpfHelper {

   public static void Startup()
    {
        var appDomainSetup = new AppDomainSetup()
        {
            ApplicationBase = Path.GetDirectoryName(typeof(WpfHelper).GetType().Assembly.Location)
        };

        AppDomain domain = AppDomain.CreateDomain(DateTime.Now.ToString(), null, appDomainSetup);

        CrossAppDomainDelegate action = () =>
        {
            Thread thread = new Thread(() =>
            {
                var app = new WpfApplication.App();

                WpfApplication.App.ResourceAssembly = app.GetType().Assembly;

                app.MainWindow = new WpfApplication.MainWindow();
                app.MainWindow.Show();
                app.Run();
            });

            thread.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
            thread.Start();

        };

        domain.DoCallBack(action);
    }

}

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