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My original data set has 62 variables. For variables c(3:56) I would like to loop the function boxplot.with.outlier.label, see

source("http://www.r-statistics.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/boxplot-with-outlier-label-r.txt")

But I am already stuck on building a function which would allow me to built the loop. Here is some mock up data (which, of course doesn't show outliers, but to my knowledge this is not part of the problem - proof me wrong!)

x <- rnorm(1000)
y <- rnorm(1000)
z <- sample(letters, 1000)
df <- as.data.frame(cbind(x,y,z))
df$x<- as.numeric(df$x)
df$y<- as.numeric(df$y)
df$z<- as.character(df$z)

This works fine:

boxplot.with.outlier.label(df$x, df$z)

And this does not:

boxplotlabel <- function (data, var, name) {
  datvar <- data[["var"]]
  namevar <- data[["name"]]
  boxplot.with.outlier.label(datvar, namevar)
}
boxplotlabel(df, x, z)
Error in plot.window(xlim = xlim, ylim = ylim, log = log, yaxs = pars$yaxs) :need finite 'ylim' values
In addition: Warning messages:
1: In is.na(x) : is.na() applied to non-(list or vector) of type 'NULL'
2: In is.na(x) : is.na() applied to non-(list or vector) of type 'NULL'
3: In is.na(x) : is.na() applied to non-(list or vector) of type 'NULL'
4: In min(x) : no non-missing arguments to min; returning Inf
5: In max(x) : no non-missing arguments to max; returning -Inf

Where am I going wrong? Or is there a different way of achieving my desired loop for the function boxplot.with.outlier.label?

I appreciate any help! Gerit

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue lies in the quotes. var and name are variables. But when you call data[["var"]] (with the quotes) you are not using the variable var but rather a string and the value of that string are the characters "var".

If you remove the quotes you will be halfway there. Var itself should have a string value. so make sure to pass it the name of the column, not the column itself.

eg:

    # If you want to get this: 
    df$x 

    df[["x"]]   # right
    df[[x]]     # wrong

Therefore, if we're using a variable for x:

    # Wrong
    var <- x
    df[[var]]

    # Right
    var <- "x"
    df[[var]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! It works just fine. See below for incorporating it into the loop. Gerit – Gerit Nov 16 '12 at 19:36

You are trying to access non-existent columns. This produces the error. None of the columns of df is named var or name.

There are two possible solutions

  1. Pass the names of the columns as character strings:

    boxplotlabel <- function (data, var, name) {
      datvar <- data[[var]]
      namevar <- data[[name]]
      boxplot.with.outlier.label(datvar, namevar)
    }
    
    boxplotlabel(df, "x", "z")
    
  2. Obtain the object names of the arguments in the function:

    boxplotlabel <- function (data, var, name) {
      datvar <- data[[deparse(substitute(var))]]
      namevar <- data[[deparse(substitute(name))]]
      boxplot.with.outlier.label(datvar, namevar)
    }
    
    boxplotlabel(df, x, z)
    
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This also works fine and I added the loop below. Unfortunately, I can only accept one answer. But I very much appreciate your help! – Gerit Nov 16 '12 at 19:37

Here is the final set of function plus loop. Just for the matter of having a complete answer, in case another newbie strikes this issue. You "just" need to create outliers.

#fct.
boxplotlabel <- function (data, var, name) {
  datvar <- data[[var]]
  namevar <- data[[name]]
  boxplot.with.outlier.label(datvar, namevar)
}
#single output:
boxplotlabel(df, "x", "z")
#loop:
col <- names(df[,c(1:2)])
for (i in seq_along(col)){
  boxplotlabel(df, col[i], "z")
}
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