Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm currently struggling to present a div structure in a certain way. Unfortunately I can only do this via css as our database system outputs the html. Basically I am trying to present the code below in the format shown in the picture:

<div class="job_classifications">
    <div class="classification x_location">
       <div class="class_type">Location</div>
       <div id="location" class="class_value"> London</div>
    </div>

     <div class="classification refno">
       <div class="class_type">Ref No</div>
       <div class="class_value">80</div>
    </div>

Class type refers to the darker heading on the left and class_value refers to the content.

Do any of you have any recommendations of how to acheive this via css? Any help would be greatly appreciated. JQuery and javascript can be used to append classes where necessary if required.

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Just a little more information. Some of the fields will not be shown for certain jobs but all headers and content will be spat out of the database encased in a div which will always have the classification class if that helps. –  jezzipin Nov 16 '12 at 15:24
3  
So the div's and class names are contained in your database? Can you change how the html gets created and stored in the database? Cause this is a perfect example of where a table would work better then div's. –  ryan Nov 16 '12 at 15:26
1  
Yes. Strongly suggest you have a conversation with your architecture people in regard to separation of concerns. Storing markup for structured data in the database is an excellent way of providing continued employment for your DB people, but a lousy way of providing efficiency of maintenance for web apps... –  Jason M. Batchelor Nov 16 '12 at 15:29
    
I'm afraid not. As a developer I know that this is tabular data and therefore should be presented using a table. Unfortunately for this page in particular the html that comes from the database is always presented in divs and it cannot be changed. –  jezzipin Nov 16 '12 at 15:29
    
Shoot your developer that wrote what it's outputting as HTML then do what ryan said... perfect example of people getting scared off of tables because they're "bad". Can you change your code to mimic the image? I'm having a hard time picturing which div is which since the html doesn't match the picture at all –  Rick Calder Nov 16 '12 at 15:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

http://jsfiddle.net/NVDjU/

Using your uploaded image as an example, this method uses floats and arbitrary widths that you can change, but may do the trick.

.job_classifications {
    width: 420px;
    font-size: 11px;
    font-family: Arial;
}

.classification {
    float: left;
}

.classification .class_type {
    font-weight: bold;
    width: 80px;
    float: left;
}

.classification .class_value {
    float: left;
    margin: 0 10px 0 0;
    width: 100px;
}   
share|improve this answer
    
why text-align: right? Text for 2nd column is left-aligned in image. –  mrk Nov 16 '12 at 15:57
    
Similar to what I did but with the double width, that only works if they can control the output order of the data, I was assuming they can't. –  Rick Calder Nov 16 '12 at 16:00
    
@mrk oops, removed formatting. Force of habit. –  Don Boots Nov 16 '12 at 16:59
    
@RickCalder I see your point about the widths. This is a more strict sense of design control. They could probably be taken out and replaced with margins. I think the core of the solution has been touched on in regards to tabular formatting. –  Don Boots Nov 16 '12 at 17:02
    
Yeah, as I said the solution is essentially identical to what I posted, it's not the widths themselves but placing them side by side likely won't end up with the order they want, if they have no control over what the HTML outputs they have no control over the order either. So what the double width solution would output would likely be this: jsfiddle.net/calder12/NVDjU/1 –  Rick Calder Nov 16 '12 at 17:14

The above being said, in the likely event that you're stuck with the markup they give you, you could use display:table*, though you'll have to be careful of old browsers if you have to support before IE8.

Given:

<div class="job_classifications">
    <div class="classification x_location">
       <div class="class_type">Location</div>
       <div id="location" class="class_value"> London</div>
    </div>

     <div class="classification refno">
       <div class="class_type">Ref No</div>
       <div class="class_value">80</div>
    </div>
</div>​​​​​​​​​

You could use css like this:

.job_classifications {
    display:table;
    border: 1px solid green;
}

.classification, .class_type, .class_value {
    display:table-cell;
    border: 1px solid blue;
}    

Obviously, the border styles are there just to illustrate the point...

Read up on display: table, see if that gets you where you need to be. http://www.digital-web.com/articles/everything_you_know_about_CSS_Is_wrong/

(Example jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/mori57/SguEb/)

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I don't think this is going to work. That just looks like a everything is going to be display in one row which isn't going to work. Also we have to support all the way back to IE 6 I believe. –  jezzipin Nov 16 '12 at 15:40

The best I can think of is something like this:

​.class_type{
float:left​;
font-weight:bold;
background-color:#DDD;
width:125px;
}
.class_value{
float:left;
background-color:#FFF;
width:125px;
}
.job_classifications{width:250px;}

http://jsfiddle.net/calder12/G29nU/

There are obviously inherit issues here since it's based on forcing the floats to break a line with set widths, which is a crap way to do it but I can't think of another way.

  • First you're only going to get one column if all that data is inside the job_classifications div as it looks like it is.
  • If you ever have data overrun the fixed width this layout cuts it off.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.