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How can i declare an array like this one:

int array[1000000];

as a static array, a stack array, and a heap-allocated array?

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4  
That doesn't make any sense... If it's on the stack, it get's pushed/popped from the stack as well, and wouldn't fulfill the static requirement. –  Cornstalks Nov 16 '12 at 15:45
2  
Perhaps he's asking about how to make a static local? But of course that's trivial -- the syntax is the same, you just put it inside a function like any other local. –  Joe Strout Nov 16 '12 at 15:47
    
He may want to know why the runtime pukes with an underflow as soon as he enters scope of a function that decrements ESP by four/eight megabytes when static is not there. Just a hunch the vernacular is confusing to him. Adem? Are you wanting this because your program dies on entering this function without static present?? –  WhozCraig Nov 16 '12 at 16:13
1  
i want it because i didn't know how to implement an array on the stack in C. It doesn't like Java which have a class for Stack –  Adem Haklı Nov 16 '12 at 16:16
    
@AdemHaklı: To declare that array on the stack, write a function like: void foo() { }, and then copy and paste that array (int array[1000000];) in between the curly braces of the function, so it becomes void foo() { int array[1000000]; }. And wham, that's an array on the stack. –  Cornstalks Nov 16 '12 at 16:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your assignment appears to be looking for this:

// global variable; NOT on the stack. Exists in the data segment of the program
int globalvar[1000000];

void func()
{
    // local stack-variable. allocated on the stack on function entry
    //  unavailable outside this function scope.
    int stackvar[1000000];

    // allocated on the heap. the only stack space used in the
    //  space occupied by the pointer variable.
    int *heapvar = malloc(1000000 * sizeof(int));
    if (heapvar != NULL)
    {
        // use heap var

        // free heap var
        free(heapvar)
    }
}

Or perhaps this:

void func()
{
    // static variable; NOT on the stack. Exists in a program data segment (usually)
    static int staticvar[1000000];
    
    // local stack-variable. allocated on the stack on function entry
    //  unavailable outside this function scope.
    int stackvar[1000000];

    // allocated on the heap. the only stack space used in the
    //  space occupied by the pointer variable.
    int *heapvar = malloc(1000000 * sizeof(int));
    if (heapvar != NULL)
    {
        // use heap var

        // free heap var
        free(heapvar)
    }
}

For what it is worth, unless you have a four or eight megabyte reserved call-stack (or larger), the function above will likely croak on entry. For such large sizes it is customary to use the heap (malloc()/free()). But that is not what your assignment appears to be about (yet).

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1  
if you create an array in a function then it is automatically on stack? –  Adem Haklı Nov 16 '12 at 16:29
    
@AdemHaklı when created as above (stackvar in both samples) yes –  WhozCraig Nov 16 '12 at 16:31
    
ok thanks.i must create an array from the heap that is another question which i am going to ask. how can i do that can you write it more detailed? –  Adem Haklı Nov 16 '12 at 16:32
    
@AdemHaklı heap variable usage in the answer above. hope it helps. –  WhozCraig Nov 16 '12 at 16:35
    
thank you very much –  Adem Haklı Nov 16 '12 at 16:46

A static declaration inside functions means, that the declared variable is shared among executions of the function it is declared in. The stack is a place in memory that may be used by whatever function is running right now; there is no way to protect an area on the stack from being overwritten while your function is not running. Static variables are usually stored either in the data or if unitialized into the bss section of your program. If you have the strict requirement to have the array in the stack, you could try copying it:

void foo(void) {
   static int my_static_array[16];
   int array_copy[16];

   memcpy(array_copy,my_static_array,sizeof array_copy);

   /* do funny stuff */

   memcpy(my_static_array,array_copy,sizeof my_static_array);
}
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where is the stack part i don't get it? –  Adem Haklı Nov 16 '12 at 16:00
    
@AdemHaklı Variables declared without any storage class (such as static) are typically (always?) stored on the stack since there is no other way to assign storage to a function. –  FUZxxl Nov 16 '12 at 16:06

A static variable cannot be on the stack, this is because static and local variables are fundamentally different, with local variables "living" in the stack while static variables "living" in the static segment. If you want a local variable to be visible to a function called by the function in which the local variable is declared, then you should pass that local variable as an argument. an other solution not recommended is to have a static pointer to an array and have it point to the array existing in the stack, this will work as long as the function in which the local array is declared, has not returned. After returning though the pointer will point to an area that other data may exist meaning that it is possible to overwrite a return address or an irrelevant local variable or function argument.

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If you want it to make array public, you can define it outside any scope (outside a block of code) and it will be declared on the text segment of the binary.

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