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It is possible to use the type of a lambda as a template argument, like

template<typename InArg, typename Function>
class selfCompose {
  Function f;
 public:
  selfCompose(Function f): f(f) {}
  auto operator() (InArg x) -> decltype(f(f(x))) {
    return f(f(x));                              }
};

int main() {
  auto f = [](int x){return x*x;};
  std::cout << selfCompose<int, decltype(f)>(f)(4)  //  yields (4²)² = 256
            << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

However, this double use of f is kind of redundant. We can omit passing the lambda's type as the template (casting it to a suitable std::function (at loss of polymorphism – but C++ lambdas aren't parametrically polymorphic anyway)), however I have an application where I'd much prefer not having to pass its value to the constructor (because I'd like to use my class's initialisations themselves as a template parameter, where a particular constructor signature is expected). I'd like it to work like

template<class InArg, class Function>
class selfCompose {
  Function f;
 public:
  selfCompose() {}  // default constructor for f
  auto operator() (InArg x) -> decltype(f(f(x))) {
    return f(f(x));                              }
};

int main() {
  auto f = [](int x){return x*x;};
  std::cout << selfCompose<int, decltype(f)>()(4) << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

but this doesn't compile because lambdas have a deleted default constructor. Which is of course inevitable for capturing lambdas, but for simple ones like the one in my example this doesn't make much sense to me: they don't need to reference any local variables.

Is there some other way to get this functionality, or do I have to resort to defining the lambda old-fashionly as a named class?

struct myFun {
  auto operator() (int x) -> int {return x*x;}
};

(of course, the lambda functions I'd like to use aren't quite as simple as x → x², so just selecting from a few standard function classes wouldn't be flexible enough)

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3 Answers 3

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Benjamin already posted a nice workaround for your case. You could use that.

My solution is just an improved version of Benjamin's answer where you don't have to specify the lambda parameter type. So instead of writing this:

make_selfCompose<int>(f)(4); //Benjamin's solution

you can write just this:

make_selfCompose(f)(4); //improved - absence `int` template argument.

and let make_selfCompose deduce the lambda parameter type itself.

For this solution, lets write first function_traits class template as:

#include <tuple>

template <typename T>
struct function_traits : public function_traits<decltype(&T::operator())>
{};

template <typename C, typename R, typename... A>
struct function_traits<R(C::*)(A...) const>
{
   template <size_t i>
   struct arg
   {
      typedef typename std::tuple_element<i, std::tuple<A...>>::type type;
   };
};

Then here is an improved version of make_selfCompose:

template<typename Fun> //<--- now it has one template parameter
selfCompose<typename function_traits<Fun>::template arg<0>::type, Fun>
make_selfCompose(Fun f)
{
  typedef typename function_traits<Fun>::template arg<0>::type InArg; //deduce it
  return selfCompose<InArg, decltype(f)>(f);
}

Here is test program:

int main() {
  auto f = [](int x){return x*x;};
  std::cout << make_selfCompose(f)(4)  //notice the relief here!
            << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

See an online demo

Hope that helps. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Not what I was hoping for, but +1 for the function_traits stuff (though I'm afraid it doesn't help much in my problem – but it looks very interesting, I need to learn this) and accepted for explaining why it doesn't work as I'd like. –  leftaroundabout Nov 16 '12 at 16:41
    
@leftaroundabout: You could improve function_traits class template, and use it generically to make your code work. –  Nawaz Nov 16 '12 at 16:43
1  
To be fair, it wouldn't be hard for the standard to require that stateless lambdas can be trivially constructed, while still being convertible to pointer-to-function. Then [](){}->void would be struct Stateless { static void doop() {}; void operator()() const {doop();}; operator void(*)()() const { return &Stateless::doop; }; }; or the standardese equivalent. As far as I can tell, this would be consistent with almost all standards-compliant C++11 code (except for ones that somehow detect deleted constructors). –  Yakk Nov 16 '12 at 18:29
6  
"The type of lambda is not necessarily a class." -- Wrong, it's required to be a unique, unnamed non-union class type (§5.1.2/3). It's also required to overload operator() (same clause, p5). –  Xeo Nov 16 '12 at 19:13
2  
"In fact, the Standard requires stateless lambda to be convertible to pointer-to-function. So stateless lambdas are functionally free functions, not class." Total non sequitur. I don't see how the conclusion possibly follows. As Xeo point out, the reality is exactly the opposite: it must be a class type. –  GManNickG Nov 16 '12 at 19:18

You can follow the example of functions like make_pair and make_shared:

template<typename InArg, typename Function>
selfCompose<InArg, Function> make_selfCompose(Function f)
{
  return selfCompose<InArg, decltype(f)>(f);
}

int main() {
  auto f = [](int x){return x*x;};
  std::cout << make_selfCompose<int>(f)(4)
            << std::endl;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's nice, but it's just a wrapper for the way I do not want to go right now: pass f as a value. What I'd like to do is to pass only the type of f: since this type has only one value at all (namely f) it should be possible to deduce it in the default contructor. –  leftaroundabout Nov 16 '12 at 16:02
    
@leftaroundabout: type of f is just type. It can have many values. Think of max() and min() for example, they're different, but both could have same type int(int,int). So if you're given int(int,int), then you cannot know which function it is. –  Nawaz Nov 16 '12 at 16:03
    
@Nawaz not really. The obvious implementation of my lambda is just a stateless class with one member, operator(). –  leftaroundabout Nov 16 '12 at 16:05
    
@leftaroundabout: It is not necessarily a class. In fact, the Standard requires stateless lambda to be convertible to pointer-to-function. So stateless lambdas are free functions, not class. –  Nawaz Nov 16 '12 at 16:05
    
@Nawaz lots of things are convertible in C++, e.g. int -> double, yet these are quite different types. The type of a lambda is certainly not equal to the type of the function pointer it can be converted to. –  leftaroundabout Nov 16 '12 at 16:10

If selfCompose is made polymorphic, there is no need to either explicitly pass the parameter type or to inspect the stored functor type. The latter means that it will also be able to deal with polymorphic functors.

template<typename Functor>
struct self_compose_type {
    // Omitting encapsulation for brevity
    Functor functor;

    // It is possible to overload operator() to deal
    // with all cv and ref qualifiers combinations
    template<typename... T>
    auto operator()(T&&... t)
    // Don't use std::result_of for the return type
    -> decltype( std::declval<Functor&>()(std::declval<T>()...) )
    { return functor(std::forward<T>(t)...); }
};

template<typename Functor>
self_compose_type<Functor>
self_compose(Functor&& functor)
{ return { std::forward<Functor>(functor) }; }

// C++03 style:
template<typename Functor>
self_compose_type<typename std::decay<Functor>::type>
make_self_compose(Functor&& functor)
{ return { std::forward<Functor>(functor) }; }

It is not necessary to make the operator() variadic, you can make it accept exactly one argument if you so wish.

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