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Currently I have a object that contains a large list of items (which will not change at run time) that takes up a large amount of memory and this object will be used in multiple sessions (per user) and should be identical in each one.

So instead of copying the large object or creating a new instance in each session, I decided to use it as a shared resource. So that each session will read from the object's list to get the items and do what it needs to do with them. I want to conserve memory as this is a web application.

However, these items in the list also have events, and each session will need to subscribe to these events.

So what happens is when an item event is fired, it fires it in all sessions. So I had to add some logic to check to see which session fired this event and only use it for that session.

Is there a better way to do this? a more efficient way? I'm afraid that if I get a ton of user session going that this will really bog down the processing when an event is fired on these shared items.

What are your thoughts? Also of note, when processing these "items", there is no way to know how long each one will take, thus why I leaned towards using events.

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Perhaps create a local copy of the object in the item list (the one that fires the event). This way, you still need only one copy of the large container object, but by allowing each session it's own copy of the smaller objects, the event should be local to the session. –  Kevin Nov 16 '12 at 16:01
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What is a session? Is it a web app? Is your app running in a single proces for all users? And how/where are you storing your session? In memory (in-proc in web app) or in a database? In memory session storage sort of prevents you from using a web farm –  Maarten Nov 16 '12 at 16:05
    
Ditto, what kind of app is this? –  Blam Nov 16 '12 at 16:35
    
@Maarten A session is an in-proc object stored in the web app's memory. So each session has some static values that are shared across all, but also has unique data. Currently i don't think this will be hosted on a web farm, but that may be something to think about in the future for sure –  Carthorn Nov 16 '12 at 16:45
    
@Maarten and yes, this is running in one single process for all users. More specifically MVC3 –  Carthorn Nov 16 '12 at 16:54
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So what happens is when an item event is fired, it fires it in all sessions. So I had to add some logic to check to see which session fired this event and only use it for that session.

This means that the event in the shared data is still fired whenever a request initiates the action that eventually fires that event, but you prevent the event from bubbling up to each session. Still, this means that eventhandlers are created between the shared data and all sessions.

Is there a better way to do this? a more efficient way? I'm afraid that if I get a ton of user session going that this will really bog down the processing when an event is fired on these shared items.

Your solution does pose some problems. Since eventhandlers are created between sessions and the shared data, the session objects cannot be garbage collected when the session expires (I'm assuming here that you do not cleanup the eventhandler when the session exipres, please correct me if I'm wrong). Consequence: a memory leak.

What are your thoughts? Also of note, when processing these "items", there is no way to know how long each one will take, thus why I leaned towards using events.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean. Why does events solve whatever the problem is when you do not know how long each one will take? The events and their eventhandlers are still executed sequentially.

I'm afraid I cannot give a better solution for this since its unclear to me how the shared data is shared among the session app. You've mentioned events in the shared data, but how do they work? You've mentioned that the event should only be handled by the session that initiated the action, so one solution I suppose is to give the shared data a callback function when you start the shared-data-action. The callback function can then be called when necessary, and this way no eventhandler are created which bind the session objects to the shared data, so garbage collection should not be a problem.

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Well I have it currently set to have all items disposed properly, but I think my structure just needs to be rethought. It was one of those lets do it this way, then halfway through, the requirements have changed. Anyways thanks for your help. I'm just going ahead and mark this as the answer as I am handling it in a similar fashion as you have described. –  Carthorn Nov 16 '12 at 20:07
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