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It is likely an implementation detail, but for the Oracle and IBM JDKs at least is the compiled pattern cached or do we as application developers need to perform the caching of compiled patterns ourselves?

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3 Answers 3

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I don't believe the results are cached and there's no evidence of such behaviour in the code or the documentation. It would (of course) be relatively trivial to implement such a cache yourself, but I would be interested in a use case in which such caching is beneficial.

Re. the comment below and String.split(), there's a different approach in that the code takes a distinct path for trivial 1 or 2 char patterns vs more complex regexps. But it still doesn't appear to cache.

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To avoid parsing regular expression every time? If I recall correctly, in JDK 7 String.split() does caching of Pattern for simple cases. –  maximdim Nov 16 '12 at 16:24
    
I understand it would avoid parsing the regexp each time, but my experience of regexps is that a) I've not often been concerned with performance b) if I have, it's rarely the compilation stage which has concerned me. YMMV –  Brian Agnew Nov 16 '12 at 16:27
    
Thanks that's pretty lousy that it does provide some sort of optimization within the JDK code itself. It just does a new Pattern() Thanks for the links. –  Archimedes Trajano Nov 16 '12 at 16:29
    
In Python, if you pass a pattern to e.g. re.match(), the compiled versions of the most recent patterns will be cached. That way, if you call the function over and over again there will be no performance penalty for compiling the pattern. That way, you don't need to store the compiled pattern, and inexperienced people won't be hit by the performance penalty... I guess :-). docs.python.org/2/library/re.html#module-contents –  helpermethod Nov 16 '12 at 16:33

As far as I know from looking at the code (JDK 6) it doesn't do caching but once constructed, Pattern object could be cached on application side and shared among multiple threads. Standard pattern seems to be to assign it to final static variable:

private static final Pattern p = Pattern.compile(",");
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It doesn't. If you have performance sensitive areas, you might want to hold your pattern objects as member variables.

Clojure does this more or less automatically when you have a regex in a function though.

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