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I want to design a linkedlist to another linkedlist, so far I have this method in MyLinkedList class:

public void addList(int index, E e){
        if(index == 0){
            addFirst(e);
        } else if (index >= size){
            addLast(e);
        }
        else{
            Node<E> current = head;
            for(int i = 1; i < index; i++){
                current = current.next;
            }
            Node<E> temp = current.next;
            current.next = new Node<E>(e);
            (current.next).next = temp;
            size++;
        }
    }

I'm stuck on the method itself, my main program has two LinkedLists that looks like this:

MyLinkedList<String> strings1 = new MyLinkedList<String>();
        strings1.add("java");
        strings1.add("language");
        strings1.add("cooler");
        strings1.add("noob");
        System.out.println(list1);

        MyLinkedList<String> strings2 = new MyLinkedList<String>();
        strings2.add("artistic");
        strings2.add("cereal");
        strings2.add("bowl");
        System.out.println(list2);

Then I wanna add the linkedlist of string2 into linkedlist of string1. How would I do that? I have thought of using

strings1.addList(2, strings2); 

but it didn't work, it won't let me add strings2 to strings1 I'm thinking the output would look like this if I have it done: java, language, artistic, cereal, bowl, cooler, noob or something similar, please help!

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1  
Do you want to add the contents of one list to the other? Or do you want to add the actual list itself to a new linked list? –  Code-Apprentice Nov 16 '12 at 16:19
    
Also, what happens when you say "it didn't work"? How do you know that "it won't let you add strings2 to string1"? What happens when you try? –  Code-Apprentice Nov 16 '12 at 16:20
    
Why do you need to create another class ? You could use the original class itself. If you need custom indexes, use arrays. –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Nov 16 '12 at 16:27
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3 Answers 3

Use the method addAll(int index, Collection c) to add the two lists together.

strings1.addAll(startIndex, strings2);

You also have to implement the List interface to your class MyLinkedList.. It also isn't really clear what your MyLinkedList class looks like?

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The question is about implementing a method in a custom linked list class. –  Code-Apprentice Nov 16 '12 at 16:22
    
Well, you can't add two things to the same index so i'm not sure what you are trying to achieve? –  Captain Obvious Nov 16 '12 at 16:25
    
Isn't List#addAll(int, java.util.Collection) what you want to achieve? I don't see why you would rewrite it if you can implement the List interface –  Captain Obvious Nov 16 '12 at 16:30
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You have a method in your class which accepts a single node, simply call this as many times as you need for the second list:

e.g.

void addAll(int index, MyList<> second_list)
{
  for(Object o : second_list)
  {
    addList(index, o);
    ++index;
  }
}

The above range based for loop may not work unless your class has implemented the proper interfaces, I'm being lazy - use the normal iteration that your class supports...

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+1 For answering the actual (unclear -- IMO) question. –  Code-Apprentice Nov 16 '12 at 16:25
    
+1 Oops... sorry, gave you + 1, your solution is actually correct. my bad. –  Renato Nov 16 '12 at 16:31
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Easiest possible way....

public void insertList(int index, List<String> list) {
    Collections.reverse(list);
    for (String str : list) {
        add(index, str);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, this code snippet should go into a sub-class of LinkedList. –  Renato Nov 16 '12 at 16:28
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