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I have a database table with a unique constraint on it (unique (DADSNBR, DAROLEID) pair). I am going to be inserting multiple values into this table simultaneously, so I'd like to get it done using one query - I'm assuming this would be the faster way. My query is thus:

INSERT ALL
    INTO ACCESS (DADSNBR, DAROLEID) VALUES (68, 1)
    INTO ACCESS (DADSNBR, DAROLEID) VALUES (68, 2)
    INTO ACCESS (DADSNBR, DAROLEID) VALUES (68, 3)
    INTO ACCESS (DADSNBR, DAROLEID) VALUES (68, 4)
SELECT 1 FROM DUAL

Since there are some entries within the statement that are duplicates of those already in the database, the whole insert fails and none of the rows are inserted.

Is there a way to ignore the cases where the unique constraint fails, and just insert the ones that are unique, without having to split it up into individual INSERT statements?

Edit: I realised I probably don't want to do this anyway, but I'm still curious as to whether it's possible or not.

share|improve this question
    
None of your rows are duplicates (?!) –  Vincent Malgrat Nov 16 '12 at 16:42
    
I mean they are duplicates of the values that already exist in the database prior to performing the insert statement. Edited my question for clarity. –  Maccath Nov 16 '12 at 16:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In Oracle, statements either succeed completely or fail completely (they are atomic). However, you can add clauses in certain cases to log exceptions instead of raising errors:

The second method is all automatic, here's a demo (using 11gR2):

SQL> CREATE TABLE test (pk1 NUMBER,
  2                     pk2 NUMBER,
  3                     CONSTRAINT pk_test PRIMARY KEY (pk1, pk2));

Table created.

SQL> /* Statement fails because of duplicate */
SQL> INSERT into test (SELECT 1, 1 FROM dual CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 2);

ERROR at line 1:
ORA-00001: unique constraint (VNZ.PK_TEST) violated

SQL> BEGIN dbms_errlog.create_error_log('TEST'); END;
  2  /

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> /* Statement succeeds and the error will be logged */
SQL> INSERT into test (SELECT 1, 1 FROM dual CONNECT BY LEVEL <= 2)
  2   LOG ERRORS REJECT LIMIT UNLIMITED;

1 row(s) inserted.

SQL> select ORA_ERR_MESG$, pk1, pk2 from err$_test;

ORA_ERR_MESG$                                       PK1 PK2
--------------------------------------------------- --- ---
ORA-00001: unique constraint (VNZ.PK_TEST) violated   1   1

You can use the LOG ERROR clause with INSERT ALL (thanks @Alex Poole), but you have to add the clause after each table:

SQL> INSERT ALL
  2   INTO test VALUES (1, 1) LOG ERRORS REJECT LIMIT UNLIMITED
  3   INTO test VALUES (1, 1) LOG ERRORS REJECT LIMIT UNLIMITED
  4  (SELECT * FROM dual);

0 row(s) inserted.
share|improve this answer
3  
It does work with INSERT ALL, but you need to put a LOG ERRORS clause after each INTO ..., as shown a bit obliquely in the docs. So in this case INSERT ALL INTO test VALUES (1, 1) LOG ERRORS REJECT LIMIT UNLIMITED INTO test VALUES (1, 1) LOG ERRORS REJECT LIMIT UNLIMITED SELECT * FROM dual. Which maybe makes sense as the INTOs might be for different tables. –  Alex Poole Nov 16 '12 at 17:49
    
@AlexPoole Thanks, I didn't know that. It makes sense ! –  Vincent Malgrat Nov 19 '12 at 9:07
    
DBMS_ERRLOG worked a treat, and I didn't have to change my query structure - thanks for sharing! One thing though, is it wise to be cautious about using this method because of the amount of space/resources it takes up in logging the errors rather than avoiding them in the first place? –  Maccath Nov 19 '12 at 14:40
    
@Maccath it involves extra work. If you're running lots of inserts and you're not interested in the log, it might be a better idea to rewrite your queries as per @a_horse_with_no_name's answer. –  Vincent Malgrat Nov 19 '12 at 15:20

Use the MERGE statement to handle this situation:

merge into "ACCESS" a
using
( 
   select 68 as DADSNBR,1 as DAROLEID from dual union all
   select 68,2 from dual union all
   select 68,3 from dual union all
   select 68,4 from dual
) t 
on (t.DADSNBR = a.DADSNBR and t.DAROLEID = a.DAROLEID)
when not matched then 
  insert (DADSNBR, DAROLEID)
  values (t.DADSNBR, t.DAROLEID);
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I tried to use the following query but got an error. I can't immediately see what's wrong with it, but I don't have an eye for Oracle yet. ORA-00928: missing SELECT keyword: merge into DADSNBR using ( select :q0 as DADSNBR, :q1 as DAROLEID from dual union all ) t on (t.DADSNBR = access.DADSNBR and t.DAROLEID = access.DAROLEID) when not matched then insert (DADSNBR, DAROLEID) values (t.DADSNBR, t.DAROLEID) I changed the second DADSNBR in your query to DAROLEID since that's what I assume you meant, but that didn't solve it. :( –  Maccath Nov 19 '12 at 14:33
1  
@Maccath - union all combines several select statements - four in this example, as in your original question - into a single result set. Your version has a trailing union all; that should not appear after the last select sub-statement. –  Alex Poole Nov 19 '12 at 14:59
    
This script is too confusing, you have DADSNBR twice as a column name and as the table name, then your matching clause has that twice.. I'm surprised Oracle didn't even throw an error if you even tested this. Finally your query doesn't answer the question. Finally, if you were to use the correct table name as the OP, this statement still doesn't prevent duplicates from being inserted into there, you're just removing from the source not the target. –  sksallaj Nov 1 '13 at 18:26
    
@sksallaj: thanks for pointing out my typos, I have corrected them. It does answer the question because it prevents duplicates from being inserted by using a single statement. Because if the rows are there, then the MERGE will have a "match", but as there is no WHEN MATCHED clause, nothing will happen. So only non-existing rows will be inserted into the target table. See my example here: sqlfiddle.com/#!4/79c66/3 –  a_horse_with_no_name Nov 1 '13 at 18:47
    
okay I gave back your upvote :) –  sksallaj Nov 6 '13 at 5:11

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