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I have a class called date:

public class Date{
    private String monthAndDate;
    public Date(String inputMonthAndDate){
        monthAndDate = inputMonthAndDate;
    }
}

I have another class called Patient. Is it possible to get the syntax of monthAndDate from class Date and pass it to a private field in the class Patient?

Thank you.

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1  
If you wanted to access them from another class, why did you make them private in the first place? –  NullUserException Nov 16 '12 at 17:29

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Note: you should avoid naming classes with names already used by the standard JDK.

To answer your question, you can simply provide a getter in your Date class:

public class Date{
    private String monthAndDate;
    public Date(String inputMonthAndDate){
        monthAndDate = inputMonthAndDate;
    }
    public String getMonthAndDate(){
        return monthAndDate;
    }
}

You can now call:

String s = someDate.getMonthDate();
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Not without adding a getter to your Date class. That's part of the point of making fields private.

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yeah... I'm just confused. Sorry for asking this question. :P –  cook cook Nov 16 '12 at 17:51

You are trying to breach the data encapsulation concept. private fields/methods can ONLY be accessed locally in the class and will not be available to other classes.

Add a accessor method e.g. getMonthAndadte() to return the monthAndDate value in Date class.

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You can easily accomplish this with reflection, but that would be recommended only if Date is outside of your control, has no legitimate API to do this, and you absolutely must get to it after considering all the consequences.

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Sample scenario for accessing your private field is within this code:

public class Date
{
    private String monthAndDate;

    public Date(String inputMonthAndDate)
    {
        monthAndDate = inputMonthAndDate;
    }

    public String getMonthAndDate()
    {
        return monthAndDate;
    }
}

public class Parent
{
   private yetAnotherField;

   Parent()
   {
       this.yetAnotherField = (new Date("some string")).getMonthAndDate();
   }
}
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2 ways to do it:

- Use Getter for field monthAndDate and using Composition principle in the class which needs to access this field.

- Using Reflection, this will be bit tougher for beginners.

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Reflection would work, but that is almost certainly a terrible idea. Reflections should only be used for testing (if necessary), meta-tools, and advanced libraries that do things automagically. –  ArtB Nov 16 '12 at 17:33
    
@ArtB i just told the OP the ways to access it, i didn't recommend it. See my first point which is a legitimate way to do it... –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Nov 16 '12 at 17:34
    
Oh, I understand and assumed you did as well, but I just wanted to make sure that the original asker realised that it was a strongly discouraged approach. –  ArtB Nov 16 '12 at 17:42

Not with private but have you considered using "package private"? If something is "package private" then it can only be seen by other classes in the same package. The confusing thing is that it doesn't have a keyword... it is the default scope.

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You could with Reflection but providing a getter Method would be the better solution.

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Using reflection:

final Field field = Date.class.getDeclaredField("monthAndDate");
field.setAccessible(true);

final String monthAndDate = (String)field.get(date);

(with

Date date = new Date("anything");

)

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Don't you need to setAccessible() on the field first since it was declared private originally? –  ArtB Nov 16 '12 at 18:17
    
@ArtB: yes, you are right: fixed –  Illyr Nov 16 '12 at 18:44

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