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I am trying to understand how Java stores integer internally. I know all java primitive integers are signed, (except short?). That means one less bit available in a byte for the number.

My question is, are all integers (positive and negative) stored as two's complement or are only negative numbers in two's complement?

I see that the specs says x bit two's complement number. But I often get confused.

For instance:

  int x = 15; // Stored as binary as is?  00000000 00000000 00000000 00001111?
  int y = -22; // Stored as two complemented value? 11111111 11111111 11111111 11101010

Edit

To be clear, x = 15

   In binary as is: `00000000 00000000 00000000 00001111'
  Two's complement: `11111111 11111111 11111111 11110001`

So if your answer is all numbers are stored as two's complement then:

  int x = 15; // 11111111 11111111 11111111 11110001
  int y = -22 // 11111111 11111111 11111111 11101010

The confusion here again is the sign says, both are negative numbers. May be I am misreading / misunderstanding it?

Edit Not sure my question is confusing. Forced to isolate the question:

My question precisely: Are positive numbers stored in binary as is while negative numbers are stored as two's complement?

Some said all are stored in two's complement and one answer says only negative numbers are stored as two's complement.

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2  
-ve numbers ???????? –  Coffee Nov 16 '12 at 18:26
    
Two's complement necessarily means that positive numbers are represented by the actual bit values of that number... at least as I understand it. EDIT: Also, two's compliment means one less bit in the total number of bytes in the primitive, not one less bit PER byte. –  LJ2 Nov 16 '12 at 18:32
    
your assumption is right: positive and negative numbers are two's complement, and your x and y are correct. –  jlordo Nov 16 '12 at 18:35
    
A side note: it's something of a WTF, that Java, a language of Internet era, does not have datatype to represent eg. TCP/IP port number (16 bit unsigned value) accurately, leading to really ugly code at times. –  hyde Nov 16 '12 at 18:47
    
check the wiki article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… the 2's complement number you have given for 15 is wrong –  dungeon Hunter Nov 16 '12 at 19:27

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

byte:

Byte data type is a 8-bit signed two's complement integer.

Short:

Short data type is a 16-bit signed two's complement integer.

int:

Int data type is a 32-bit signed two's complement integer.

long:

Long data type is a 64-bit signed two's complement integer.

float:

Float data type is a single-precision 32-bit IEEE 754 floating point.

double:

double data type is a double-precision 64-bit IEEE 754 floating point.

boolean:

boolean data type represents one bit of information.

char:

char data type is a single 16-bit Unicode character.

Source

Two's complement

"The good example is from wiki that the relationship to two's complement is realized by noting that 256 = 255 + 1, and (255 − x) is the ones' complement of x

0000 0111=7 two's complement is 1111 1001= -7

the way it works is the msb(most significant bit) receives a negative value so in the case above

-7 = 1001= -8 + 0+ 0+ 1

Positive integers are generally stored as simple binary numbers (1 is 1, 10 is 2, 11 is 3 and so on).

Negative integers are stored as the two's complement of their absolute value. The two's complement of a positive number is, when using this notation, a negative number.

Source

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1  
My question precisely: Are +ve numbers stored in binary as is while -ve numbers are stored in two's complement? –  Kevin Rave Nov 16 '12 at 19:16
    
Positive integers are generally stored as simple binary numbers, and Negative integers are stored as the two's complement. –  dreamcrash Nov 16 '12 at 19:26
    
That answers my question. Any source? I found no document that clearly says this. –  Kevin Rave Nov 16 '12 at 19:28
    
    
the above link from ecomware.com is broken @dreamcrash , can you provide some other? –  Ram swaroop Mar 4 at 12:19

Java integers are of 32 bits, and always signed. This means, the most significant bit (MSB) works as the sign bit. The integer represented by an int is nothing but the weighted sum of the bits. The weights are assigned as follows:

Bit#    Weight
31      -2^31
30       2^30
29       2^29
...      ...
2        2^2
1        2^1
0        2^0

Note that the weight of the MSB is negative (the largest possible negative actually), so when this bit is on, the whole number (the weighted sum) becomes negative.

Let's simulate it with 4-bit numbers:

Binary    Weighted sum            Integer value
0000       0 + 0 + 0 + 0           0
0001       0 + 0 + 0 + 2^0         1
0010       0 + 0 + 2^1 + 0         2
0011       0 + 0 + 2^1 + 2^0       3
0100       0 + 2^2 + 0 + 0         4
0101       0 + 2^2 + 0 + 2^0       5
0110       0 + 2^2 + 2^1 + 0       6
0111       0 + 2^2 + 2^1 + 2^0     7 -> the most positive value
1000      -2^3 + 0 + 0 + 0        -8 -> the most negative value
1001      -2^3 + 0 + 0 + 2^0      -7
1010      -2^3 + 0 + 2^1 + 0      -6
1011      -2^3 + 0 + 2^1 + 2^0    -5
1100      -2^3 + 2^2 + 0 + 0      -4
1101      -2^3 + 2^2 + 0 + 2^0    -3
1110      -2^3 + 2^2 + 2^1 + 0    -2
1111      -2^3 + 2^2 + 2^1 + 2^0  -1

So, the two's complement thing is not an exclusive scheme for representing negative integers, rather we can say that the binary representation of integers are always the same, we just negate the weight of the most significant bit. And that bit determines the sign of the integer.

In C, there is a keyword unsigned (not available in java), which can be used for declaring unsigned int x;. In the unsigned integers, the weight of the MSB is positive (2^31) rather then being negative. In that case the range of an unsigned int is 0 to 2^32 - 1, where an int has range -2^31 to 2^31 - 1.

From another point of view, if you consider the two's complement of x as ~x + 1 (NOT x plus one), here's the explanation:

For any x, ~x is just the bitwise inverse of x, so wherever x has a 1-bit, ~x will have a 0-bit there (and vice versa). So, if you add these up, there will be no carry in the addition and the sum will be just an integer every bit of which is 1.

For 32-bit integers:

x + ~x = 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111
x + ~x + 1 =   1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 1111 + 1
           = 1 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000

The leftmost 1-bit will simply be discarded, because it doesn't fit in 32-bits (integer overflow). So,

x + ~x + 1 = 0
-x = ~x + 1

So you can see that the negative x can be represented by ~x + 1, which we call the two's complement of x.

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My question precisely: Are +ve numbers stored in binary as is while -ve numbers are stored in two's complement? –  Kevin Rave Nov 16 '12 at 19:17
    
Well, yes. a negative number is represented to a computer as the two's complement of its positive value. –  0605002 Nov 16 '12 at 19:29
    
Great answer and explanation Bonny @0605002, +1 :) –  Keen Learner Nov 17 '12 at 5:06
    
Fabulous... Greatest explanation I have ever read... –  AKh Feb 6 at 0:41

I have ran the following program to know it

public class Negative {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int i =10;
        int j = -10;

        System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(i));
        System.out.println(Integer.toBinaryString(j));
    }
}

Output is

1010
11111111111111111111111111110110

From the output it seems that it has been using two's complement.

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Twos complement of 10 is 11111111 11111111 11111111 11110110. Yours prints while Binary as is for 10 is 1010. So only -ve numbers are stored as two's complement? –  Kevin Rave Nov 16 '12 at 19:26
    
check the wiki article en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… the 2's complement number you have given for 15 is wrong –  dungeon Hunter Nov 16 '12 at 19:28
    
if the msb bit starts with 1 it will be negative number –  dungeon Hunter Nov 16 '12 at 19:29
    
yes two's complement of 10 is 11111111 11111111 11111111 11110110 which is -10 –  dungeon Hunter Nov 16 '12 at 19:30
    
+ve numbers will be stored as binary leaving the sign bit in 2's complement –  dungeon Hunter Nov 16 '12 at 19:32

According to this document, all integers are signed and stored in two's complement format for java. Not certain of its reliability..

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"In two’s complement format, a positive value is represented as a straightforward binary number." written in the same document .. so technically it's correct then. :) –  BrainDead Sep 3 '13 at 17:34

Oracle provides some documentation regarding Java Datatypes that you may find interesting. Specifically:

int: The int data type is a 32-bit signed two's complement integer. It has a minimum value of -2,147,483,648 and a maximum value of 2,147,483,647 (inclusive).

Btw, short is also stored as two's complement.

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The most significant bit (32nd) indicates that the number is positive or negative. If it is 0, it means the number is positive and it is stored in its actual binary representation. but if it is 1, it means the number is negative and is stored in its two's complement representation. So when we give weight -2^32 to the 32nd bit while restoring the integer value from its binary representation, We get the actual answer.

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1  
Welcome to StackOverflow! :D –  0605002 Nov 16 '12 at 18:58
    
Care to give Source? –  Kevin Rave Nov 16 '12 at 19:14

positive numbers are stored directly as binary. 2's compliment is required for negative numbers.

for example:

15 : 00000000 00000000 00000000 00001111
-15: 11111111 11111111 11111111 11110001

here is the difference in signed bit.

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