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I was trying to do code coverage on a simple hello world program in C++. The target device is an arm processor and hence I am using GNU ARM toolchain.

arm-elf-gcc -mcpu=arm7tdmi -O2 -g -c main.c -o main.exe creates a .gcno file but fails to create a .gcda file which is needed by gcov to find out the code coverage.

Normally when I run g++/gcc -fprofile-arcs -ftest-coverage .cpp,it first creates a .gcno file and an .exe. After running the a.exe , it generates the .gcda file.

Here when I try to run the main.exe to generate the .gcda, it throws an error - Program too big to fit in memory. How do I resolve this issue? Am I going wrong somehere?

Thanks, A-J

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I think I have found out the reason. The arm executable won't run on x86. But then, how can I get the code coverage without being able to run an exe? –  aditya3524 Nov 16 '12 at 19:53

1 Answer 1

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Obviously, you have to run your executable on the target device. The target device must have a filesystem. Upon exit, the executable writes coverage information using ordinary POSIX functions - open, fcntl, write, close, etc. Look at gcov-io.c in GCC sources. Make sure you can successfully link libgcov.a into your executable, that you have write permission on the target device, etc.

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I will try this. Also, is the syntax correct? Do I have to create an -o main.elf file and then run this on the target? I am new to this. –  aditya3524 Nov 16 '12 at 20:42
    
Usually they target won't bother what is the name of the file. The OS loader will look for ELF signature and at ELF header inside the file itself and refuse to execute it if the type in the ELF header is not ET_EXEC. –  chill Nov 16 '12 at 20:51
    
Okay. Thank you very much! –  aditya3524 Nov 16 '12 at 21:05

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