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If I have a map m is there a better way of getting a slice of the values v then

package main
import (
  "fmt"
)

func main() {
    m := make(map[int]string)

    m[1] = "a"
    m[2] = "b"
    m[3] = "c"
    m[4] = "d"

    // Can this be done better?
    v := make([]string, len(m), len(m))
    idx := 0
    for  _, value := range m {
       v[idx] = value
       idx++
    }

    fmt.Println(v)
 }

Is there a built feature of a map? Is there a function in a Go package, or is this the best code to do if I have to?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, no. There is no builtin way to do this.

As a side note, you can omit the capacity argument in your slice creation:

v := make([]string, len(m))

The capacity is implied to be the same as the length here.

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As an addition to jimt's post:

You may also use append rather than explicitly assigning the values to their indices:

m := make(map[int]string)

m[1] = "a"
m[2] = "b"
m[3] = "c"
m[4] = "d"

v := make([]string, 0, len(m))

for  _, value := range m {
   v = append(v, value)
}

Note that the length is zero (no elements present yet) but the capacity (allocated space) is initialized with the number of elements of m. This is done so append does not need to allocate memory each time the capacity of the slice v runs out.

You could also make the slice without the capacity value and let append allocate the memory for itself.

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I was wondering if this would be any slower (assuming up front allocation)? I did a crude benchmark with a map[int]int and it seemed about 1-2% slower. Any ideas if this is something to worry about or just go with it? –  masebase Nov 17 '12 at 17:17
    
I would assume append to be a little bit slower but that difference is, in most cases, negligible. Benchmark comparing direct assignment and append. –  nemo Nov 17 '12 at 18:12

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