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I have 2 text boxes (winforms app) on a button press I have the following code:

        string new_text = txtnew.Text;
        string old_text = txtold.Text;

        char[] arr_new = new_text.ToCharArray();
        char[] arr_old = old_text.ToCharArray();
        double found  = 0.0;
        double not_found = 0.0;
        foreach (char c_old in arr_old)
        {
            foreach (char c_new in arr_new)
            {
                if (c_new == c_old)
                {
                    found++;
                }else{
                    not_found++;
                }
            }
        }
        double percentage //need help here..
        MessageBox.Show(percentage.ToString());

What I've been trying to do is compare each array to see if a character from 1 array exists in the other array and then it's supposed to output the difference as percentage. So if txtNew = "hello worl" and txtold="hello world" then the difference would be like 0.1% ? anyway the more it gets modified the bigger the difference is until it's at a safe state of 60% different.

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closed as not a real question by Adi Lester, Sam I am, dove, rene, Abizern Nov 17 '12 at 13:32

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
So what's the question? –  Adi Lester Nov 16 '12 at 19:15
1  
How did you get .1% difference in your example. It would more like 10% difference. This only works if the strings are exactly the same length otherwise. If 9/10 characters match thats 90%. Why don't you just divide the number of characters that matched to the length of the string. You find the difference by subtracting the match percentage ( decmial value ) from 1. –  Ramhound Nov 16 '12 at 19:18
    
It's not clear what you consider to be the difference is the difference between dog and god 0? They have all the same chars. –  evanmcdonnal Nov 16 '12 at 19:18
1  
@evanmcdonnal - Based on his example it would be 2/3 character matched so 33% difference and 77% match. –  Ramhound Nov 16 '12 at 19:20
    
@Ramhound sounds about right :p –  evanmcdonnal Nov 16 '12 at 19:21

3 Answers 3

You can calculate the percentage by dividing the not_found by the total, like this:

double percentage = (100.0 * not_found) / (found + not_found);

A more precise way to do it would be to calculate the Edit Distance between the strings, and then express that distance in terms of the percentage of the length of the original string (i.e. using the edit distance instead of not_found).

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+1 Levenshtein FTW. Here's a C# implementation: dotnetperls.com/levenshtein –  w0lf Nov 16 '12 at 19:18

If you increase not_found in the inner loop it's going to up to old_text.Length*new_text.Length. This will generate huge not_found numbers giving you much smaller percentages than I think you are after.

Also no point in doing the char array stuff, and the inner can be replaced by an IndexOf call:

    string new_text = txtnew.Text;
    string old_text = txtold.Text;

    var found = 0;
    foreach (var c_old in old_text)
    {
        if (new_text.IndexOf(c_old) != -1)
        {
          found++;
        }
    }
    //percentage of characters in the old text that also appear in the new text
    double percentage = (100d * found) / old_text.Length;    
    MessageBox.Show(percentage.ToString());
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Take a look at this Wikipedia page: Damerau-Levenshtein distance

There is a C# function provided on that page which I think does exactly what you're looking for.

Edit: Just realized someone else already referred to this same algorithm, sorry for the duplicate.

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