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I can do

locale loc(""); // use default locale
cout.imbue( loc );
cout << << "i: " << int(123456) << " f: " << float(3.14) << "\n";

and it will output:

i: 123.456 f: 3,14

on my system. (german windows)

I would like to avoid getting the thousands separator for ints -- how can I do this?

(I just want the users default settings but without any thousands separator.)

(All I found is how to read the thousands separator using use_facet with the numpunct facet ... but how do I change it?)

share|improve this question
    
Are you open to work arounds, or must we modify the thousands separator? I have the feeling printf will print in the format you want, and also converting it to a string before printing will most likely achieve the desired result. –  evanmcdonnal Nov 16 '12 at 19:24
    
@evanmcdonnal - I really want a solution with no workaround and especially without printf. I just want the users default settings but without any thousands separator. –  Martin Ba Nov 16 '12 at 19:27
    
Cry because IOstreams and locales suck. –  Puppy Nov 16 '12 at 19:46
    
@DeadMG - indeed. Especially how they're (not) documented sucks big time. –  Martin Ba Nov 16 '12 at 20:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Just create and imbue your own numpunct facet:

struct no_separator : std::numpunct<char> {
protected:
    virtual string_type do_grouping() const 
        { return "\000"; } // groups of 0 (disable)
};

int main() {
    locale loc("");
    // imbue loc and add your own facet:
    cout.imbue( locale(loc, new no_separator()) );
    cout << "i: " << int(123456) << " f: " << float(3.14) << "\n";
}

If you have to create a specific output for another application to read, you may also want to override virtual char_type numpunct::do_decimal_point() const;.

If you want to use a specific locale as base, you can derive from the _byname facets:

template <class charT>
struct no_separator : public std::numpunct_byname<charT> {
    explicit no_separator(const char* name, size_t refs=0)
        : std::numpunct_byname<charT>(name,refs) {}
protected:
    virtual string_type do_grouping() const
        { return "\000"; } // groups of 0 (disable)
};

int main() {
    cout.imbue( locale(std::locale(""),  // use default locale
        // create no_separator facet based on german locale
        new no_separator<char>("German_germany")) );
    cout << "i: " << int(123456) << " f: " << float(3.14) << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm confused by "\000" - that's a NUL followed by two zeroes, isn't it? –  Martin Ba Nov 16 '12 at 20:39
    
@MartinBa It's a null expressed in such a way that if the next character is an octal digit it won't change to another character (you can't do that with hexadecimal notation which hasn't a bounded number of characters). –  AProgrammer Nov 16 '12 at 20:55
    
@MartinBa the \nnnescape sequence is actually octal. That facet allows you to create a custom sequence like "\001\003\002" which would result in a 12.345.6 grouping. –  Anonymous Coward Nov 16 '12 at 21:07

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