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I have been thinking generally about exception handling.

What would be the best practice for implementing a method that gets a User object based on the supplied username parameter. See below.

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a user.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="username">Username</param>
    /// <returns>User instance</returns>
    public Model.User GetUser(string username)
    {
        return Context.Users.SingleOrDefault(u => u.Username.ToLower() == username.ToLower());
    }

if no user exists with that username parameter, would it be better to return a null User object or rather throw a custom exception specifying that the user does not exist.

share|improve this question
    
What are you expecting from calling the method? Does it matter if a user is returned or is it mandatory? – Bob. Nov 16 '12 at 19:22
    
    
IMHO exceptions exist for exceptional cases, if a user does not exist yo should handle it returning null. on the other hand if you have a db connection problem you should handle the exception, rethrow it, etc... – Salvador Sarpi Nov 16 '12 at 19:25
    
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". – John Saunders Nov 16 '12 at 19:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Throw an exception. Otherwise, your caller, and your caller's caller, and everyone else will need to check for null, or will need to handle an empty collection.

If this is a general-purpose method, meant to be used in a context where the caller knows he needs to check for null, then I'd do this a bit differently. I would have a private method that returns null if there are no users who match. I would add a caller which uses the "try" pattern:

public bool TryGetUser(string username, out Model.User user)

and also one that simply returns the user, but throws an exception if not found

public Model.User GetUser(string username)
share|improve this answer
    
This post best answers my concerns, and in addition, I have read somewhere that if a module cannot for whatever reason do what it says it can do which in this case is to return a User object then throw an exception. – kooldave98 Nov 16 '12 at 19:33
    
They won't have to check for null if you implement null object pattern. – weston Nov 16 '12 at 19:38
    
I disagree completely with this answer. Exceptions are for exceptional situations. Failing to find a matching entry is not an exceptional situation. Returning null makes both perfect logical and perfect programming sense- you found nothing, therefore return nothing. In fact, code like the above answer suggests results in developers using try/catch as part of the control flow of their code, which is terrible practice. – MgSam Jan 4 '13 at 18:25
    
It depends on the contract of the method. If the contract is "get a user", then an exception should be thrown when you can't get a user. If the contract is "get a user or null if you can't find one", then return null. But if the contract (implicit or otherwise) causes the caller to expect a user to be returned, then you need to throw an exception when no user is returned. – John Saunders Jan 4 '13 at 18:27
    
In what circumstance is it beneficial that the method throws if it doesn't match? It can result in 3 scenarios: a) The programmer has to check themselves if the collection contains the value beforehand to prevent the exception, thereby obviating the need for the method in the first place. b) The programmer wraps the call in try/catch and uses that to determine success/failure- terrible programming practice. c) Crashes the program with an unhelpful exception message. By returning null the caller not the callee decides what they should do. I agree that is needs to be documented. – MgSam Jan 4 '13 at 18:52

My advice would be if the program cannot continue without a user then throw an exception. If it is ok that you cannot find a user or that this would be a log-in fail then I would return null. I would only throw an exception if the program could not continue without getting the user and it could not say redirect to log-on again.

Remember throwing an exception is more of an expensive operation that returning null too (I mean nothing noticeable and do think like this (micro-optimization) but exceptions should be used for normal business logic)

share|improve this answer
1  
forget about being expensive, make sure the program does what it needs to do properly., – DarthVader Nov 16 '12 at 19:26
    
right the thing is this method is intended to be used in various scenarios, login and to get User from just knowing the username. Or would it be better to have separate methods for login and getting a user ? – kooldave98 Nov 16 '12 at 19:26
    
@DarthVader yes agreed, I just wanted to add that there is a cost to exceptions – Brad Semrad Nov 16 '12 at 19:28
    
@kooldave98 Wouldn't you want to kept the logged in user in a session object already after they are logged in? – Brad Semrad Nov 16 '12 at 19:30
    
@BradSemrad this module is not only intended for Logging-In, it is a general method to get a user, and can be leveraged for other purposes as the developer sees fit. – kooldave98 Nov 16 '12 at 19:39

First I just want to suggest an improvement on your method of comparing strings without case sensitivity.

/// <summary>
/// Gets a user.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="username">Username</param>
/// <returns>User instance</returns>
public Model.User GetUser(string username)
{
    return Context.Users.SingleOrDefault(u => 
       string.Compare(u.Username, username, true));
}

String.Compare on MSDN

Now my suggestion on this issue

Rather than return null. You may like to return a Null object, using the null object pattern.

public class User
{

  public static readonly User Null = new Null{Username = "Anonymous"};

  ...

}

Then your method becomes:

public Model.User GetUser(string username)
{
    return Context.Users.SingleOrDefault(u => 
       string.Compare(u.Username, username, true)) ?? Model.User.Null;
}

This is useful in situations where null is undesirable. It removes the need to check for null later. If this user object has rights associated for example, you can just make sure the "null user" has no rights.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, this makes no sense if the User object is meant to be something real in the system. Now you have to make sure, not only that the null user has no rights, but that they can't be listed in a list of users, or in fact, that the null user actually acts like it doesn't exist. You'd do better with an exception. – John Saunders Nov 16 '12 at 19:53
    
@JohnSaunders In this case I agree. The method is called GetUser. it would not be smart to then return a User that was not the user requested. But if the name I chose was better, you might not mind it showing up in a list of users. e.g. "Anonymous" – weston Nov 16 '12 at 19:58
    
Perhaps a "User" is a bad example for the Null Object pattern, but I can't think of any cases where I'd prefer to return a fake entity than to admit that the requested entity does not exist. Fake entities don't usually exist in the problem domain, in my experience. – John Saunders Nov 16 '12 at 20:03
    
@JohnSaunders Yes I admit that returning it from this function given it's name is probably not a good use if it. However, I think this could be useful as a default state before a user has logged in for example, to save lots of null checks. Depends on what the rest of the code looks like really. – weston Nov 16 '12 at 20:13
    
Again, not a great example. In ASP.NET, for instance, if my code needed to know if the current user were Authenticated, I would simply check User.IsAuthenticated. More likely, I'd simply specify in the .config file that most pages require authentication, then I wouldn't have to check at all. – John Saunders Nov 16 '12 at 21:31

I would say that the calling method can decide whether or not the result of no user being found requires the throwing of an exception. If a username is provided, but not found, returning null makes sense to me and letting the calling code decide how it needs to proceed.

Given how generic the method is, why would you throw an exception if a supplied username is not found? It's one thing if a database error occurs etc, but if the SELECT results in no rows, I think it is not exceptional.

share|improve this answer

I disagree with the previously posted answers.

Exceptions should be used only in exceptional circumstances. Failing to find a matching value is not exceptional. IMO, returning null is much more elegant- it leaves the decision about whether to throw an exception to the caller, not the callee, and it makes sense; you ask the method for a user and if there is none it returns nothing.

In addition, your code and the other answers iterate through the entire collection each time, which is going to be unnecessarily slow. You should use a dictionary for quick lookups, (unless, of course, there are frequent changes to the Users collection which makes caching impossible).

Example:

class MyClass
{
    private Dictionary<String,User> _userLookup;

    public MyClass()
    {
        _userLookup = Context.Users.ToDictionary(u => u.UserName.ToLower());
    }

    private User getUserByName(String name)
    {
        var lowerName = name.ToLower();
        return _userLookup.ContainsKey(lowerName) ? _userLookup[lowerName] : null;
    }     
}
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