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I have a diamond problem which look like this:

    __ A
  /    |\
 |  B  |  \
v|/v v\|v  \v
 B2   B3    C
  \v  /v   /
    B4    /
     \   /
       D

I tried many way to make the best virtual inheritance to get no duplicates but I couldn't find a solution. The class A contains a position. Here's a sample output:

Call: A() position pointer is: 0x2203be8
Call: B()
Call: B2() position pointer is: 0x2203be8
Call: B3() position pointer is: 0x2203be8
Call: C() position pointer is: 0x2203a28
Call: B4() position pointer is: 0x2203be8
Call: D() position pointer is: 0x2203a28

Why does D and C don't have the same pointer for position? Why there's no constructor for this A::position? What virtual inheritance should I make to solve this? Thanks.

EDIT:

Here's a code sample:

class A;
class B;
class B2 : public virtual B, public virtual A;
class B3 : public virtual B, public virtual A;
class C : public virtual A;
class B4 : public virtual B2, public virtual B3;
class D : public B4, public C;

EDIT 2: To make the output, I put this code inside each constructors:

A::A()
{
    std::cerr << "Call: A() position pointer is: " << &_position << std::endl;
}
share|improve this question
4  
That's a hideous looking diamond. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 16 '12 at 19:22
    
Diamond within a Diamond! –  Science_Fiction Nov 16 '12 at 19:24
    
You need to provide the actual inheritance relationships you are using. Consider using the format in the single answer (just provide 'derived_type : [virtual] base, [virtual] base2...'). It would also be interesting to explain how you are generating the output –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 16 '12 at 19:27
1  
Is inheritance really what you want(need)? Sometimes the answer is no. You have other option to inheritance. Consider them! –  andre Nov 16 '12 at 19:29
2  
How is the value of the "position pointer" determined? –  Pete Becker Nov 16 '12 at 19:30

3 Answers 3

Since you say the below code, which works on the implementations I have, is broken for you then obviously the code isn't the problem. The problem is with something else in your set up; perhaps a compiler bug. You should narrow down what else could be the cause of the problem; since the code itself is ruled out as a problem perhaps the best next step is to update your compiler.

In any case that makes this question rather specific to your set up. If you do find a solution that might apply to other people then you should come back and post it. Until then I'm voting to close this question.


I'm trying to reproduce your issue. Here's the code I'm using:

#include <iostream>

struct A { int a; };
struct B { int b; };
struct B2 : virtual B, virtual A {};
struct B3 : virtual B, virtual A {};
struct B4 : virtual B2, virtual B3 {}; // these virtuals are unnecessary in this case...
struct C : virtual A {};
struct D : B4, C {};

int main() {
    D d;
    std::cout << &((B4*)&d)->a << '\n';
    std::cout << &((B3*)(B4*)&d)->a << '\n';
    std::cout << &((B2*)(B4*)&d)->a << '\n';
    std::cout << &((A*)(B2*)(B4*)&d)->a << '\n';
    std::cout << &((A*)(B3*)(B4*)&d)->a << '\n';
    std::cout << &((C*)&d)->a << '\n';
    std::cout << &((A*)(C*)&d)->a << '\n';
}

But the results I get are as expected, where the a member is the same for every object. I get the same results if I use print the addresses out in the constructors as well: http://ideone.com/8FdQ1O

If I make a slight change and remove the virtual keyword from C's definition:

...
struct C : A {};
...

(version using constructors)

then I do see the problem you describe where C has it's own A sub-object different from the virtual one used by B2, B3, and B4.

Are you sure you're using the virtual keyword in all the places you need it? The results you show seem to indicate you're missing it somewhere. Also I note that the output you show does not reflect the same order of constructors as the code fragments you show; the output shows A() first, but the code indicates that B() should be executed first.


The way virtual inheritance works is that a most derived type will contain a single virtual sub-object for each type that is virtually inherited anywhere in the inheritance tree. Additionally the most derived type will contain a sub-object for each instance of non-virtual inheritance:

struct A {};
struct B : virtual A {};
struct C : A, B {};
struct D : virtual A, C {};
struct E : A, D {};
struct F : virtual A, E {};
struct G : A, F {};

G g;

g contains a total of four A sub objects; one for each time A is non-virtually inherited (in C, E, and G), and once for all of the times A is virtually inherited (in B, D, and F).

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, I added all the virtual keyword needed and I still get the bug. I used 4.6.3 –  Guillaume Racicot Nov 16 '12 at 21:06
    
@GuillaumeRacicot are you saying that when you ran the program I provided you saw the issue? Or did you modify your code somehow? You'll have to provide enough of your actual code in order for anyone to diagnose the problem because the fragments already provided don't seem to contain the cause of the problem. –  bames53 Nov 16 '12 at 21:44
    
the program you sent to me was exactly the same a have. The problem is that I have the same code as the working one... –  Guillaume Racicot Nov 16 '12 at 22:00
    
If take my exact (as in not even a semicolon placed differently) code, which doesn't show the issue when run on gcc 4.5 on ideone.com or any other compiler I have access to, and it shows the issue when you run it, then the problem would seem to be a bug with your specific setup. Perhaps it's a bug in gcc 4.6.3. You'll have to experiment to find a work-around. I don't know of any work-arounds and can't experiment, because I can't reproduce the issue in the first place. –  bames53 Nov 16 '12 at 22:41
    
I'll give a try to gcc 4.5, if it works I'll report the bug –  Guillaume Racicot Nov 17 '12 at 2:25

What code do you currently have? It looks like the solution is going to be:

class D;
class C : public virtual D;
class B4 : public virtual D;
class B2 : public virtual B4;
class B3 : public virtual B4;
class B : public B2, public B3;
class A : public B2, public B3, public C;

based on your diagram. If I'm reading it wrong and A is the base, not D. Then it would need to look like this:

class A;
class B;
class B2 : public virtual B, public virtual A;
class B3 : public virtual B, public virtual A;
class C : public virtual A;
class B4 : public virtual B2, public virtual B3;
class D : public B4, public C;
share|improve this answer
    
oh! let me rewrite for A then. –  OmnipotentEntity Nov 16 '12 at 19:26
1  
To make it more obvious, the only virtuals they're missing from your second set are the ones on D. –  Joseph Mansfield Nov 16 '12 at 19:31
    
the second is the good code –  Guillaume Racicot Nov 16 '12 at 19:53

Why does D and C don't have the same pointer for position?

Because you are non-virtually inheriting D from B4 and C. That means you have two copies of A (and two pointers).

In D constructor &B4::position is different from &C::position

Why there's no constructor for this A::position?

No idea, any chances that your A class has more than one constructor, and that a default-silent constructor is called by C::C()?

What virtual inheritance should I make to solve this?

Make all virtual. That means that you need to explicitly call every constructor from D::D() (i.e. A::A(),B::B(),B2::B2(),B3::B3(),C::C() ).

Tbh I believe you should reconsider your hierarchy. I don't know the details, but it seems that your problem has a cleaner solution via component-design.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I only have one constructor for A and it seems the second pointer for Position is not initialized –  Guillaume Racicot Nov 16 '12 at 20:04
1  
Even when B4 and C are inherited from non-virtually, the inheriting object will share a single A for both of them, because they both use virtual inheritance for A. It does not matter how D inherits. Also there is no need to explicitly call every constructor for D. –  bames53 Nov 16 '12 at 20:56

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