Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an application which multicasts certain packed POD structs and a listener service which runs in other binaries. The listener service knows what the structs look like so when it receives them it casts it back into that struck with a reinterpret_cast and performs a callback.

The problem down the line is if binaries are released and new information needs to be added to the structs, those binaries would have to be rebuilt or they will be reinterpret_cast - ing and misusing information. This can be a problem in a production environment where one doesn't have that flexibility all the time.

One thing I was told was that the way to go about it is to introduce the new style message, and have both of them being sent out..and with time, applications will eventually switch over to the new type of binary message until one can stop sending the old one. I was wondering if there is a better alternative.

For example, if one makes the convention of only adding new fields to the end of the packed struct, then old listening binaries might still be able to get to those new fields if they want to, and the ones built with the old information might still be able to access the top portions. So for example, if the sender is multicasting this:

struct foo {
    int  a;
    char b[2];
} __attribute__ ((packed));

and then several binaries are built on receiver ends which get const char* msg messages on the wire and do this:

foo* fooPtr = reinterpret_cast<foo*>(msg); 
registeredGuy->callback(fooPtr);

Now if we ever decide to roll out extra information on the sender side, old listeners might ok if we just tack it to the bottom like so:

struct foo {
    int  a;
    char b[2];
    char newStuff[17];
    int  k;
} __attribute ((packed));

old receivers should be able to still successfully cast and access their old info, while new guys can access the new stuff. Is this true? And are there better solutions which do not induce a hit on the speed (performance is very critical)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Sending two versions of what is essentially the same message is a bad idea. Especially for performance-critical systems. You end up spending at least twice as much time doing the actual sending. You also end up broadcasting more than twice as much information, so you could saturate your network.

The problem of versioning message payloads has existed as long as mesasge payloads themselves. My way of thinking is that the best way of fixing the problem is avoiding it altogether.

The key is understanding how the clients will receive and process the inbound data. Typically a client is going to listen for a UDP frame on the wire, suck it in, and processes that frame as a message. Ideally, your UDP frames are smaller than the MTU for your architecture (say 1500 bytes), so the messages won't get chopped up in transit. They may arrive out of order, but that's an altogether different problem.

Clients know how big the UDP frame was, because they pulled it off the wire. They also know how big the message they will process is, because it's just sizeof(MessageType). The only thing they don't know is the difference between the size of the frame and the size of the payload. You can tell them that, by including a fixed-size header with every message.

The header would look something like this:

struct MsgHeader
{
  size_t  msg_size_;
  int  msg_type_;
  char payload_[0];
};

The actual message would either overlay this, or come immediately after it (in &payload_[0]).

The client now reads the UDP frame, gets the size of the frame from the header, and pulls that many total bytes as a single mesasge. Starting at the payload pointer, the client casts the inbound data as the message type in question. If there is more data in the single message than fits in the message type the client understands, the client just ignores it and drops it on the floor.

As you make changes to the mesasges, you need to ensure backward binary compatibility, by not moving the location of any existing fields. Add your new fields at the end, increase the frame size in the header accordingly, and Bob's your uncle.

share|improve this answer
    
So in this scenario we would have struct foo : public MsgHeader and the sender would be setting msg_size_ to sizeof(foo). But, if an old client casts payload_ to an old foo, it'll implicitly drop trailing addenda on the floor right? Thus not requiring the client to check for size? –  Palace Chan Nov 16 '12 at 20:18
    
The client needs to check the size if you "chunk" multiple messages in a single UDP frame. –  John Dibling Nov 16 '12 at 20:28
    
Or if a single message could span multiple UDP frames –  John Dibling Nov 16 '12 at 20:29
    
Yes that makes sense, but if every message results in it's own sendto call (and they are way less than the MTU) then I think size might not be needed and backward compatibility is fine as long as we only tack onto the end for every "new version" right? –  Palace Chan Nov 16 '12 at 20:43
    
I suppose not, at least right now. However, I'd still include it. Once you establish the header's structure, you'll want to never change it. Including the payload size will help you in the future; for example, if you one day decide to chunk messages in order to reduce bandwidth. –  John Dibling Nov 16 '12 at 20:57

Typically you wouldn't change the original struct to add additional fields, but rather define a new struct that has the same fields as the original at the beginning. In order for old clients to be able to safely process the binary form of newer version of the struct the size of the instance needs to be included as a field in the first version.

By including the size in each instance, then foo can be extended to fooex in the future and old clients can still safely process a series elements comprised of a mix of foo and fooex since the old clients can check how big each instance is rather than assuming they are the size of foo.

For example:

struct foo {
 size_t size;
 int  a;
 char b[2];
} __attribute__ ((packed));

struct fooex {
 size_t size;
 int  a;
 char b[2];
 char newStuff[17];
 int  k;
} __attribute ((packed));
share|improve this answer
1  
but what good is it for the old clients to check the size if they are built in a way which is unaware of newStuff and int k? I'm not sure I follow.. –  Palace Chan Nov 16 '12 at 19:50
    
It allows the old clients to process a mix of foo and fooex without crashing or creating a security exploit. For example if an old client gets binary data with 3 fooex in a row, and doesn't have size information, it will offset by the size of foo and the get garbage for the 2nd and 3rd elements. –  Josh Heitzman Nov 16 '12 at 19:59
    
Oh I see, but in this scenario every mutlicast message contains exactly one of the packed structs. Though I suppose it is still good practice to include the size of the message as the first field. Or some sort of version header. –  Palace Chan Nov 16 '12 at 20:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.