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I've been making a lot of progress on a problem I've been trying to solve lately, but I could use some advice on a particular ordering problem. I'm trying to find a way to represent the lexicographical order of a list of numbers, each having it's own range (defined before ordering is a concern).

Each list has 7 elements. Each element can have a range of anywhere from 0 to 0-3. Perhaps a concrete example will help.

I have an array with 7 elements [2, 1, 0, 1, 3, 2, 3]. This list abstractly represents a number of possible lists for which I want to generate a lexicographical order. (Edit: To be more clear. The values at each digit represent the maximum value that that digit can be in the set of possible lists. As such, the first digit in the example could be thought of as a base 4 number, the second as a base 2 number, the third as a base 1 number, etc.) The first few elements to this list would be as follows:

  1. [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
  2. [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
  3. [2, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
  4. [0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
  5. [1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
  6. [2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
  7. [0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0]
  8. [1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0]

Hopefully the pattern is clear. I would then like to be able to efficiently call a function f(m) which returns the mth value in this sequence. I found this article which feels like it gets really close to what I'm looking for (it provides an efficient way to get the lexicographical mth place in a set with fixed value combinations), but I'm having trouble bridging the gap between the two ideas (although I have recreated the results in the article and I believe I understand them somewhat).

Anyone have any ideas on how to create a function f(m) which returns the mth value in a sequence defined by a 7 element list similar to the one provided in the above example?

P.S. I apologize if this problem has been restated in some other form and I have not found it. I have done significant searching, but nothing seems to quite map back on to this. Links, brainstorming, general ideas are all welcome!

Edit 2: Fixed the error in my example where the first element was 3 instead of 2.

share|improve this question
    
[3, 1, 0, 1, 3, 2, 3]. This list abstractly represents a number of possible lists for which I want to generate a lexicographical order. How? Can you make the question more clear? – Shashwat Nov 16 '12 at 19:37
    
Each value in the original array represents the maximum value in the range of possible values for that location in the array. So you can see the first value in the example is 3. This means that that digit can have values of 0 through 3. You can see in the ordered list, the values cycle like a base 4 number. Similarly, the 1 represents a base 2 number, the 2 represents a base 3 number, and the 0 represents a base 1 number. I suppose you could rewrite the array according to each base if that makes the problem clearer. It doesn't effect the overall question. Does that help? – user986122 Nov 16 '12 at 19:58
    
I should point out that [2, 12, 60, 60] represents daily clock time: am/pm, hour, minute, second. In general, what you're doing is multi-base arithmetic, where each column has a different base and, correspondingly, a different number of "digits". – eh9 Nov 20 '12 at 5:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edit: Replaced the original answer with the far more straightforward conversion. Check the earlier revision if you really want to see the backward solution.

Note that the initial array you give does not match the sample list (the first element of the array should be 2). I'll use the corrected array in my answer.

Given an input array [2, 1, 0, 1, 3, 2, 3], the number of possible elements at each position is,

[3,2,1,2,4,3,4]

giving us 3*2*1*2*4*3*4 = 576 possibilities.

To determine leftmost (low order) element the value of the mth member of the list, where 0 <= m < 576, we need to find the remainder of m/3, or m mod 3. The next element would be (m div 3) mod 2, and so on. In pseudocode, then:

increment all elements of A by 1

// we now have A = [3,2,1,2,4,3,4]
// m is given
// result is in R[7]
for i = 0 to 6
    R[i] = m mod A[i];
    m = m div A[i];
end

If you adjust your sample list above to start at 0 you should get the same results. Here's a sample calculation using A = [3,2,1,2,4,3,4] and m = 11:

11 mod 3 = 2 (11 div 3 = 3)
 3 mod 2 = 1 (3 div 2 = 1)
 1 mod 1 = 0 (1 div 1 = 1)
 1 mod 2 = 1 (1 div 2 = 0)
 0 mod 4 = 0
 0 mod 3 = 0
 0 mod 4 = 0

So the 11th list element (zero-based) is [2,1,0,1,0,0,0].

share|improve this answer
    
I fixed the error in my sample. I don't know why I didn't think of that! Thank you very much! It makes perfect sense now. – user986122 Nov 16 '12 at 22:27
    
@user986122 Yeah, if you look at my original solution it's really ugly. I had to relate it to decimal-to-binary conversion to really see it. – beaker Nov 16 '12 at 22:35

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