Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which is the recommended approach?

Using include:

// subroutine.php

echo 'hello '.$a;

// usage.php

$a = 'foo';
include 'subroutine.php';

Using function:

// subroutine.php

function subroutine ($a)
{
    echo 'hello '.$a
}

// usage.php

include 'subroutine.php';
$a = 'foo';
subroutine($a);

Since both technically work and since there is no "subroutines" in PHP unlike ASP for example. What is the best way to emulate subroutines?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by mario, jeroen, rdlowrey, WereWolf - The Alpha, Jason McCreary Nov 16 '12 at 21:21

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
recommended for what exactly? –  Bob Fincheimer Nov 16 '12 at 21:14
1  
That depends on the actual code, output length, frequence of usage. Template includes are still widely used. Short output functions are just as common. –  mario Nov 16 '12 at 21:14
    
functions of course, cause you can put as much as you want in the functions file and call it one time in the top of the page, and it wont affect the page if non of the functions is called –  Mohd Moe Nov 16 '12 at 21:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A function is better suited for this purpose. Includes are more widely used for templating, or for when the controller calls a view.

However, your function should not echo the concatenated string. It should return it.

$a = "foo";
echo subroutine($a);

function subroutine($a) { return "hello " . $a; }

This makes your code testable.

share|improve this answer

It would depend on context, wouldn't it? The first example would be to prefer if you were doing something similar to MVC, where you include the view into the code. But the second example feels clearer as you can see the function call in the program flow.

In this specific example I would say that option 2 is to prefer as it's clearer what is going on.

However, PHP hasn't got subroutines in the same way as ASP. ASP has functions that return data and subroutines that don't. PHP only has functions, which can act as both. The best is to save all output you need(through function calls and classes) and print it "manually" wherever you need it. So the prefered way to do things in PHP is.

<?php
    function subroutine($var) {
        return 'Hello '.$var;
    }

    $a = 'foo';
    echo subroutine($a);
?>

But as a rule, includes should contain function definitions and called script should have the calls to the functions. As it best describes the program flow when debuging.

share|improve this answer

Depends on the code, but most of the time you create some functions and call the right one :P.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.