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I am trying to sorting a generic list of objects using the objects Name property. I am using LINQ and the following expressions doesn't quite work:

var query = possibleWords.OrderBy(x => x.Name.ToLower()).ToList();
foreach (Word word in query) //possibleWords.OrderBy(word => word.Name))
   {
            listWords.Items.Add(word.Name);
   }

"query" should now contain a list of ordered items, if I understand it correctly and item should be added to the listbox named listWords.

However the output is this:

http://screencast.com/t/s1CkkWfXD4 (sorry for the URL link, but SO has somehow locked me out of my account and I apparently can't post images with this new one).

The listbox is almost alphabetical but not quite. For some reason "aa" and "aaaa" comes last. What can be the reason, and how to resolve it?

Thanks in advance.

Elaboration by request

This code, when entered in Visual Studio and executed:

        List<Word> words = new List<Word>();

        words.Add(new Word("a"));
        words.Add(new Word("Calculator"));
        words.Add(new Word("aaa"));
        words.Add(new Word("Projects"));
        words.Add(new Word("aa"));
        words.Add(new Word("bb"));
        words.Add(new Word("c"));

        IEnumerable<Word> query = words.OrderBy(x => x.Name.ToLower()).ToList();

        foreach (Word word in query)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(word.Name);
        }

Gives me the following output:

a
bb
c
Calculator
ccc
Projects
aa
aaa

This is not sorted correctly: The first "a" is correct, but the subsequent "aa" and "aaa" entries are sent to the bottom of the list.

I'm not too knowledgeable about character sets and encoding, so possibly I am making a rookie mistake here. But in that case I do not recognize what that might be, and I would be a bit puzzled as to why the first "a" is ordering correctly, but the second and third "aa" and "aaa" is not!

Further elaboration - Word class

[Serializable()]
public class Word
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlAttribute("Name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public Word(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    public Word() { } //Parameter less constructor neccessary for serialization

}

Cause and resolution

Like @Douglas suggested, the problem was resolved by supplying the StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase comparer to the OrderBy method.

On further research, it seems both the FindAll and OrderBy methods (possibly others) have problems, when using Danish culture (da-DK). There might be other methods or cultures that fail, but da-DK culture and FindAll + OrderBy methods definitely are not working as intended.

The OrderBy method has the problem as described in this thread (wrongful ordering). The FindAll method has a similar, very strange problem: Assume we have a list of entries: a, aa, aaa and aaaa. When using FindAll(x => x.StartsWith("a")), it will only return "a" NOT aa, aaa and aaaa. If using StartsWith("aa"), it will correctly find aa, as well as aaa and aaaa. When using StartWith("aaa") it will again not find aaaa, only aaa! This seems to be a bug in the framework.

share|improve this question
    
Make sure you don't add some items later. I.e. verify query.Count() equals number of words in list. Also make sure you use only English characters. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 16 '12 at 21:17
1  
Instead of posting an image link, can you post a simple example showing your case? –  L.B Nov 16 '12 at 21:28
1  
i've tried the same thing with the same words, its sorted correctly –  S3ddi9 Nov 16 '12 at 21:30
1  
@user1830478 Show us your Word class –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 16 '12 at 21:50
1  
@user1830478 You still don't post the code related with Word class where your real problem lies...... just try your code by replacing Word with string. you will see that it works. –  L.B Nov 16 '12 at 21:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Could you try replacing:

IEnumerable<Word> query = words.OrderBy(x => x.Name.ToLower()).ToList();

…with:

IEnumerable<Word> query = words.OrderBy(x => x.Name, 
    StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);

There's a very small chance that it's a weird culture issue.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. I think it is the only plausible explanation at this point - OP's culture comparison is way off... –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 16 '12 at 22:13
    
That actually did the trick. I don't understand why though, except as you say Douglas, some weird culture issue. I'n not using any particular funky culture, so it's very odd. But it worked, so I guess I can go to bed now, and try to get back into the wifes good graces. Thanks a whole lot! –  Morten K Nov 16 '12 at 22:20
    
Try checking the values of CultureInfo.CurrentCulture and CultureInfo.CurrentUICulture. But have a good night first :-) –  Douglas Nov 16 '12 at 22:29
    
Hehe thanks, I'll look into why Danish culture da-DK acts this way. It's odd, but definitely a thing for tommorow. Thanks again and have a good night (or day) :-) –  Morten K Nov 16 '12 at 22:36

The following code outputs expected result:

class Word
{
    public Word(string str)
    {
        Name = str;
    }

    public string Name { get; private set; }
}

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<Word> words = new List<Word>();

    words.Add(new Word("a"));
    words.Add(new Word("Calculator"));
    words.Add(new Word("aaa"));
    words.Add(new Word("Projects"));
    words.Add(new Word("aa"));
    words.Add(new Word("bb"));
    words.Add(new Word("c"));

    IEnumerable<Word> query = words.OrderBy(x => x.Name.ToLower()).ToList();

    foreach (Word word in query)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(word.Name);
    }
}

Outputs:

a
aa
aaa
bb
c
Calculator
Projects

Update: Ok, mystery solved (kind of). If you execute the following before your code:

var cultureInfo = new CultureInfo("da-DK");
Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = cultureInfo;
Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = cultureInfo;

You get "incorrect" output:

a
bb
c
Calculator
Projects
aa
aaa

Apparently rules for danish lexicographical comparisons are different. Here's an explanation I've found on the net (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4064633/string-comparison-in-java):

Note that this is very dependent on the active locale. For instance, here in Denmark we have a character "å" which used to be spelled as "aa" and is very distinct from two single a's. Hence Danish sorting rules treat two consequtive a's identically to an "å", which means that it goes after z. This also means that Danish dictionaries are sorted differently than English or Swedish ones.

share|improve this answer
    
This is very odd. I've looked into the class definition and I don't do anything in the constructor apart from passing the string parameter to a public field in the word class. –  Morten K Nov 16 '12 at 21:51
    
I've just tried using plain strings instead of Word objects - still the same output. But it seems several people have tried the same code, with the correct result, so I'm stumped! –  Morten K Nov 16 '12 at 22:06
    
I also tried copying your example verbatim, didn't give the right sort order either. Very odd. –  Morten K Nov 16 '12 at 22:08
1  
Please see the update (yes, I don't let some things go :) ) –  Grozz Nov 19 '12 at 23:49
1  
That's a very good find @Grozz :-) I thought it was a bug, but it seems to "work as intended" really. I think it's a bad rule, since the "aa" spelling got removed from the Danish language in 1948, but at least there is some logic behind the decision. Thanks! –  Morten K Nov 24 '12 at 11:33

Most likely you last "a" is some different (non ASCII) character. Check character code (int)("a"[0]) to see if it is the same as English "a".

There is not hing wrong with sorting if it is the case - nothing to fix (except maybe understand your data better).

share|improve this answer
    
All entries are added in text through code, like: ListObj.Add("a"), ListObj.Add("aaaa"), ListObj.Add("Calculator"), ListObj.Add("bbb") etc. –  Morten K Nov 16 '12 at 21:24
1  
@user1830478, I'm not sure what you are trying to say with your comment. Are you implying that C# source code can contain only ASCII characters (obviously false)? –  Alexei Levenkov Nov 16 '12 at 21:27
    
try to print to the console or by messagebox , MessageBox.Show(string.Format("{0}", (int)'a')); & see if its 97, with copy & paste –  S3ddi9 Nov 16 '12 at 21:37
    
Seddik: It outputs 97. Levenkov: What I am implying, is that the first "a" which is sorted correctly, is the same character used, as in the "aa" and "aaaa" strings. –  Morten K Nov 16 '12 at 21:47

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