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I'm writing simple game with cells which can be in two states Free and Taken by player.

interface Cell {
    int posX();
    int posY();
}

abstract class BaseCell implements Cell {

    private int x;
    private int y;

    public int posX() {
        return x;
    }

    public int posY() {
        return y;
    }

    ...
}

class FreeCell extends BaseCell {
}

class TakenCell extends BaseCell {
    private Player owningPlayer

    public Player owner() {
        return owningPlayer;
    }

}

In each turn I need to inspect all cells to calculate next cell state with method as below

// method in class Cell
public Cell nextState(...) {...}

and collect (in Set) all cells that are not yet taken. The method above returns Cell because cell may change from Free to Taken or the opposite. I'm doing something like below to collect them:

for (Cell cell : cells) {
    Cell next = cell.futureState(...);
    if(next instanceof FreeCell) {
        freeCells.add(currentCell);
    }
    ...
}

It's ugly. How to do that to avoid such instanceof hacks? I'm not talking about another hack, but would like to find out proper OOP solution.

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6  
Why don't you use an enum like State { FREE, TAKEN; } and use it in Cell directly using any accessor like getState()? This would avoid the check with instanceof. –  Alex Nov 16 '12 at 21:57
4  
I personally would get rid of FreeCell altogether. If getOwningPlayer() returns null, the cell is free, otherwise it's not. –  biziclop Nov 16 '12 at 21:58
1  
Or even a boolean variable free and accessor boolean isFree(). There's really no need for three classes here. –  jpm Nov 16 '12 at 21:58
1  
@grafthez But presumably the same cell can be taken and then freed up multiple times. In which case you need composition rather than inheritance. –  biziclop Nov 16 '12 at 22:02
2  
Very definitely, do not think of this as a problem looking for a solution in inheritance. A Cell is a Cell, and only its status is changing. This implies maintaining a state variable (what you are calling a "flag hack"). But the flag could be used to determine whether each action or transition is permissible. –  Kevin Welker Nov 16 '12 at 22:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Okay, here's another approach you can take.

 public class Cell {

     private int x;
     private int y;
     private OccupationInfo occupationInfo;

     public int posX() {
         return x;
     }

     public int posY() {
        return y;
     }

     public OccupationInfo getOccupationInfo() {
        return occupationInfo;
     }

     public boolean isFree() {
        return occupationInfo == null;
     }
  }

And then...

  public class OccupationInfo {
      private Player owningPlayer;
      // any other data you would've put in `TakenCell`
  }

This may or may not be good for your exact purposes but it's a clean and simple design.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Composition over inheritance, describing the cell's 'freedom' as a trait instead of a specialization of Cell. Plus, by calculating the value of isFree(), you avoid duplicating information and conceal the implementation of freedom behind your API. –  jpm Nov 16 '12 at 22:18

It sounds like you are flirting with the "State" pattern but you are not quite there. Using the state pattern you would have your Cell object and a hierarchy of "Cell State" classes.

The Cell object would use composition rather than inheritance. In other words, a Cell would have a current state property. When you have a Cell where the currentState property is a FreeState object then it's a free cell. When you have a Cell where the currentState property is a TakenState object, then it's a free state.

How to do that to avoid such instanceof hacks?

Whenever you have a situation where you would need to do an instanceof, you add a method to your Cell class and just invoke it. The Cell delegates to the current state. The code in Cell which delegates to the current state does not actually know what the state is. It just trusts that the state will do the right thing. In your FreeState and TakenState you provide implementations of each method that do the right thing based on their state.

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I think the design problem here is that you have two different classes for what can be essentially two different states of the same cell.

What do you do now when a previously free cell becomes occupied? Create a new object with same coordinates and discard the old one? But it's still the same cell conceptually! (Or can there be a free cell and a taken cell with same x and y at the same time?)

From the OOP perspective, you should have one cell class with an attribute "taken", or as another anwer suggests, "owner information". If you feel that this should not be part of the cell class for whatever reason, what about keeping the owner information separate in a Map<Cell,Owner>?

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2  
Not that anyone cares, but I like this the most. Gives you the flexibility to easily change between occupied and free without a lot of instance construction. –  Chris Gerken Nov 16 '12 at 22:15
    
@pst What is this "beauty of immutable structures" you talk of? And isn't this taken care of with the Map<Cell,Owner> approach? In addition, what if one wants to associate cells with other information not part of the class, say a Map<Cell,Color> for highlighting while drawing? This would not work when one essentially exchanges the whole object on each state change. –  arne.b Nov 16 '12 at 22:22
    
This approach works but it's not very flexible. If, as OP stated, there is a need to store other information about occupied cells, you'll need more and more maps which all have to be kept in sync. –  biziclop Nov 16 '12 at 22:36
    
@biziclop Well, you could wrap the other info in one class and update only the value in the Map<Cell,OccupationI... err Map<Cell,OtherInformation>, right? ;-) Anyway, I think your answer is a good one, I just wanted to point out that he needs to answer "what is a cell" and especially whether the owner is part of it. –  arne.b Nov 16 '12 at 22:45
    
Well, I upvoted your answer too, so all's well then :) It really depends on how you view this extra information: is it part of the cell or not? –  biziclop Nov 16 '12 at 22:48

You can add method to Cell interface that will tell whether the cell is free:

interface Cell {
    int posX();
    int posY();
    boolean isFree();
}

class FreeCell extends BaseCell {
    public boolean isFree() { return true; }
}

class TakenCell extends BaseCell {
    private Player owningPlayer

    public boolean isFree() { return false; }

    public Player owner() {
        return owningPlayer;
    }
}

But I don't think this is much better than using instanceof

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Yes, I'm afraid it is not, that's why I didn't use that. –  grafthez Nov 16 '12 at 22:07
    
@grafthez This has the (slight) "advantage" of being able to make a FreeCell2: BaseCell that works like FreeCell: BaseCell .. –  user166390 Nov 16 '12 at 22:11
    
I agree, this scales better in case when you add more Cell implementations. –  hoaz Nov 16 '12 at 22:13

I think it's good place to use Factory Pattern or Abstract Factory Pattern.

Factory pattern returns an instance of several (product hierarchy) subclasses (like FreeCell , TakenCell etc), but the calling code is unaware of the actual implementation class.
The calling code invokes the method on the interface for example FreeCell and using polymorphism the correct doSomething() method gets invoked.

Instead to use instanceof (like switching) you just might invoke the same method but each class will implement it according to local overriding. This is a very powerful and common feature in many frameworks.

Instead to write:

for (Cell cell : cells) {
Cell next = cell.futureState(...);
if(next instanceof FreeCell) {
    freeCells.add(currentCell);
}
...
}

You can type:

for (Cell cell : cells) {
Cell next = cell.futureState(...);
 cell.doSomething(); // and no matter what class is FreeCell or TakenCell 
...

}

Factory pattern returns one of the several product subclasses. You should use a factory pattern If you have a super class and a number of subclasses, and based on some data provided, you have to return the object of one of the subclasses.

enter image description here

Links:

Abstract Factory pattern

Factory pattern

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It is unaware right now. Method Cell#nextState() is kind of factory, can create either Free or Taken cells. –  grafthez Nov 16 '12 at 22:04
3  
How does a "Factory Pattern" help here (unless it also knows about the "free list" and adds to it accordingly with a side-effect)? A factory would still unify at Cell. –  user166390 Nov 16 '12 at 22:08
    
@pst take a look on my edits and example, suppose its clear enough –  Maxim Shoustin Nov 16 '12 at 22:12
2  
That doesn't look like a factory pattern; just simple polymorphism. However, I am confused as to how doSomething would work without coupling to the "free list". –  user166390 Nov 16 '12 at 22:13
1  
@grafthez sometimes people try to solve only specific problem in specific short range logic and don't try to observe the extensive design of problem –  Maxim Shoustin Nov 16 '12 at 22:25

Can you have two Sets and move the cells from one to the other when they are taken? For example at the beginning you would have the freeSet full of cells and the takenSet empty. As cells are taken they are moved from freeSet to takenSet. If you have an interface above TakenCell and FreeCell you could type each set with the same interface.

Alternatively...

It would be helpful to see your definition of FreeCell and TakenCell but I would think you could model them as the same object with a nullable field that becomes populated to indicate that it is Taken. You could then use two sets types to the same class.

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Your code isn't ugly, it reads well, it clearly expresses the application logic.

A single instanceof test usually isn't something to worry about; its use is common. "Marker interfaces" are tested by instanceof. Your example is kind of a marker interface.

And instanceof is insanely fast, apparently JVM finds it worthwhile to optimize it very well.

However, a chain of instanceof tests can be a sign of problem. Add a guard to make sure the enumeration is complete.

if(o instanceof A)
    ...
else if(o instanceof B)
    ...
else if ...
...
else // huh? o is null or of unknown type
    throw new AssertionError("unexpected type: "+o); 
share|improve this answer

you can use Visitor Pattern, these FreeCell and TakenCell should implement

Visitable interface

interface Visitable {
    void accept(Visitor visitor);
}

interface Visitor {
    void visit(FreeCell freeCell);
    void visit(TakenCell takenCell);
}

in the implementation of Visitor's visit(FreeCell freecCell) method will be:

public void visit(FreeCell freeCell) {
    freeCells.add(freeCell);
}

in the implementation of Visitor's visit(TakenCell takenCell) method will be nothing

and both classes: FreeCell and TakenCell, in method accept(Visitor visitor) should have:

public void accept(Visitor visitor) {
    visitor.visit(this);
}

and in for loop you should have:

for (Cell cell : cells) {
Cell next = cell.futureState(...);
next.accept( someConcreteVisitor )
...
}

someConcreteVisitor is the Visitor's implementer's instance.

the class, where this for loop is, can be Visitable too.

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