Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a basic C# console application that reads a text file (CSV format) line by line and puts the data into a HashTable. The first CSV item in the line is the key (id num) and the rest of the line is the value. However I've discovered that my import file has a few duplicate keys that it shouldn't have. When I try to import the file the application errors out because you can't have duplicate keys in a HashTable. I want my program to be able to handle this error though. When I run into a duplicate key I would like to put that key into a arraylist and continue importing the rest of the data into the hashtable. How can I do this in C#

Here is my code:


private static Hashtable importFile(Hashtable myHashtable, String myFileName) {

        StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(myFileName);
        CSVReader csvReader = new CSVReader();
        ArrayList tempArray = new ArrayList();
        int count = 0;

        while (!sr.EndOfStream)
        {
            String temp = sr.ReadLine();
            if (temp.StartsWith(" "))
            {
                ServMissing.Add(temp);
            }
            else
            {
                tempArray = csvReader.CSVParser(temp);
                Boolean first = true;
                String key = "";
                String value = "";

                foreach (String x in tempArray)
                {
                    if (first)
                    {
                        key = x;
                        first = false;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        value += x + ",";
                    }
                }
                myHashtable.Add(key, value);
            }
            count++;
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Import Count: " + count);
        return myHashtable;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Title is mis-leading. Can we get a title edit? –  David B Sep 25 '08 at 17:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted
if (myHashtable.ContainsKey(key))
    duplicates.Add(key);
else
    myHashtable.Add(key, value);
share|improve this answer

A better solution is to call ContainsKey to check if the key exist before adding it to the hash table instead. Throwing exception on this kind of error is a performance hit and doesn't improve the program flow.

share|improve this answer

ContainsKey has a constant O(1) overhead for every item, while catching an Exception incurs a performance hit on JUST the duplicate items.

In most situations, I'd say check for the key, but in this case, its better to catch the exception.

share|improve this answer
    
I may be wrong, but I'm pretty sure checking for the presence of an item in a list is O(N), but for a hash, its O(1). –  Matt Sep 25 '08 at 16:30
    
Your right, I was thinking of a list for some reason. –  FlySwat Sep 25 '08 at 16:32

Here is a solution which avoids multiple hits in the secondary list with a small overhead to all insertions:

Dictionary<T, List<K>> dict = new Dictionary<T, List<K>>();

//Insert item
if (!dict.ContainsKey(key))
   dict[key] = new List<string>();
dict[key].Add(value);

You can wrap the dictionary in a type that hides this or put it in a method or even extension method on dictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
And yes, I am aware that multiple hits in the secondary list are very unlikely, but it doesn't hurt to be sure :) –  Morten Christiansen Sep 25 '08 at 16:43

If you have more than 4 (for example) CSV values, it might be worth setting the value variable to use a StringBuilder as well since the string concatenation is a slow function.

share|improve this answer

Hmm, 1.7 Million lines? I hesitate to offer this for that kind of load.

Here's one way to do this using LINQ.

CSVReader csvReader = new CSVReader();
List<string> source = new List<string>();
using(StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(myFileName))
{
  while (!sr.EndOfStream)
  {
    source.Add(sr.ReadLine());
  }
}
List<string> ServMissing =
  source
  .Where(s => s.StartsWith(" ")
  .ToList();
//--------------------------------------------------
List<IGrouping<string, string>> groupedSource = 
(
  from s in source
  where !s.StartsWith(" ")
  let parsed = csvReader.CSVParser(s)
  where parsed.Any()
  let first = parsed.First()
  let rest = String.Join( "," , parsed.Skip(1).ToArray())
  select new {first, rest}
)
.GroupBy(x => x.first, x => x.rest)   //GroupBy(keySelector, elementSelector)
.ToList()
//--------------------------------------------------
List<string> myExtras = new List<string>();
foreach(IGrouping<string, string> g in groupedSource)
{
  myHashTable.Add(g.Key, g.First());
  if (g.Skip(1).Any())
  {
    myExtras.Add(g.Key);
  } 
}
share|improve this answer

Thank you all. I ended up using the ContainsKey() method. It takes maybe 30 secs longer, which is fine for my purposes. I'm loading about 1.7 million lines and the program takes about 7 mins total to load up two files, compare them, and write out a few files. It only takes about 2 secs to do the compare and write out the files.

share|improve this answer
1  
Try using StringBuilder.Append instead of string+ operator and see if it makes it any faster. –  jop Sep 25 '08 at 17:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.