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I am wondering if this would cause a memory leak or an undefined outcome in C++?

string foo()
{
    char tempArray[30];
    strcpy(tempArray, "This is a test");
    return string(tempArray);
}

I know this is a bad thing in C but I haven't found a definite answer for C++.

So everyone is saying no, but I am still confused as to when the memory is deallocated?

Lets say I have this method that calls the above method

void bar()
{
    string testString = foo();
}

At what point in the above code does the string object returned from foo() call its destructor? Is it immediately after getting copied into the object testString?

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3  
It would just seem incredibly unnecessary compared to the much more obvious return "This is a test";... –  Kerrek SB Nov 16 '12 at 22:22
1  
As an aside, your comments on answers here strongly give the impression that you think C++ is or resembles C -- it isn't. ;-] –  ildjarn Nov 16 '12 at 22:28
    
Ya i know. Still trying to wrap my head around stuff. –  Jimmy Johnson Nov 16 '12 at 22:31
    
Does this compile, or is it a typo: string testString = string foo();? –  Zyx 2000 Nov 16 '12 at 23:09
    
It was a typo, its now fixed –  Jimmy Johnson Nov 16 '12 at 23:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What happens in your example is that the constructor with the signature

string ( const char * s );

is called. The constructor allocates new memory for a copy of the string and copies it to that new memory. The string object is then responsible for freeing its own memory when its destructor is called.

When you make a copy of a string, the copy constructor also allocates memory and makes a copy.

You should also take a look at the RAII pattern. This is how string's memory management works.

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No, there is no memory leak, and you don't need to do all that, here is equivalent to your code

string foo()
{
 return "This is a test";
}
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In your example you have a static string stored... In mine I have a temporary array, when it returns the pointer to the array would no longer contain the temp array just stack popped garbage –  Jimmy Johnson Nov 16 '12 at 22:20
1  
@BeenCoding2Long: No, your code does not return the temporary array, it copies its contents into a string. In both cases what's returned is a string object whose value is a copy of something else, but it makes no difference to the string object what it was a copy of. –  Steve Jessop Nov 16 '12 at 22:22
    
Ah ok I see thanks! I have been coding in C so long it hard for me to get used to the object stuff. –  Jimmy Johnson Nov 16 '12 at 22:26
2  
You should be aware that there is an implicit constructor call in that code. The C string "This is a test" is implicitly converted to a std::string because the constructor isn't declared explicit. –  Jørgen Fogh Nov 16 '12 at 22:26
    
@JørgenFogh: For what it's worth, return string(tempArray); also contains an implicit constructor call -- to the copy constructor of string in C++03, the move constructor in C++11. –  Steve Jessop Nov 16 '12 at 22:40

Not particularly efficient, but no, no leak.

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Thanks.. Do you know why not? Where is the string stored if not in the registers of the return value? And how is it cleaned up later? –  Jimmy Johnson Nov 16 '12 at 22:18
    
It's stored by the string object, and is implementation dependent. Most likely, it's on the heap, and it will be freed from the heap when the string variable goes out of scope. In your case, when the caller of foo() goes out of its scope. –  mark Nov 16 '12 at 22:20

No, it wouldn't cause any leaks as you never allocate memory on the heap. If you used malloc, calloc or new.. and you never free/delete it. Then yes, memory leak!

The array is statically allocated, so it is created on the stack. strcpy doesn't return a dynamically allocated object, it fills the existing array, it knows how to do this because of the pointer you passed in - again, not allocated on the heap. A copy of the string object is made when you return the string.

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1  
Ah okay, so an entire string object is created and returned. The same as if I returned a local structure and the object keeps track of how big the string is and where it is allocated? –  Jimmy Johnson Nov 16 '12 at 22:23
1  
A new string object is created and all the characters are copied into your that string object. But when you return that string, it returns another copy of the string object. That object knows its length and all that. –  Lews Therin Nov 16 '12 at 22:27

In this code:

char tempArray[30];

tempArray is a variable with automatic storage duration. When tempArray "falls out of scope" it is automatically destroyed. You copy the contents of this array (somewhat clumsily) in to a std::string and then return that string by value. Then tempArray is destroyed. It;s important to note here that tempArray is the array. It is not a pointer to the first element of the array (as is commonly mis-perceived), but the array itself. Since tempArray is destroyed, the array is destroyed.

There would be a leak if you used a variable with dynamic storage duration, such as with:

  char* tempArray = new char[30];
  strcpy(tempArray, "This is a test");
  return string(tempArray);

Note the new[] with no matching delete[]. Here, tempArray is still a variable with automatic storage duration, but this time it is a pointer, and the thing that it points to has dynamic storage duration. In other words, tempArray gets destroyed when it falls out of scope, but it's just a pointer. The thing that it points to -- the char array itself, is not destroyed because you don't delete[] it.

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You can always return local automatic variable from function by value. For any type this should be safe (unless copy constructor is not safe):

T foo()
{
   return T(...);
}

or:

T foo()
{
   T t
   return t;
}

Your example matches my first case.

What is not safe is returning pointer/reference to local automatic variable:

T& foo()
{
   T t
   return t;
}

T* foo()
{
   T t
   return &t;
}
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