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I will use some CMD commands in my program and these commands might throw some exceptions. And as you know, when an exception accours, CMD writes its own error message the screen. But, I want to write my own error message.

My question is this: Is there a way to block CMD messages and write only my own error messages?

P.S. This is not a complex program. It executes CMD commands using System().

Example:

Let's say, the user can rename and copy any files in the program. As you know, if the user does not enter file's path properly, an error message is showed on the screen. And I want that this error message never appears on the screen. Only my own error message is showed.

Thank you!

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Could you please be more specific? I assume you are writing a console application? And by CMD you refer to the Windows commandline? –  Max Truxa Nov 16 '12 at 22:34
    
Errors usually are written to stderr/cerr, replace that stream with your own (how depends on what OS you use) or redirect everything to a file (you'll parse). –  Adriano Repetti Nov 16 '12 at 22:42
    
I made an update! –  ciyo Nov 16 '12 at 22:52
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends on your platform and the commands you are going to use. The usage of system() for calling console commands is by the way strongly discouraged by most people (it's way to heavy for most purposes).
I would suggest to you using CreateProcess() with the CREATE_NO_WINDOW flag and waiting for the process to exit with a call to WaitForSingleObject() and GetExitCodeProcess().
This approach utilizes the fact, that most CMD command are executables, located somewhere in C:/Windows/....

/*
 * Executes a program and returns it's exit code.
 *
 * TODO: Error checking should be added for
 *   CreateProcess()
 *   WaitForSingleObject()
 *   GetExitCodeProcess()
 */
DWORD ExecCmdLine(TCHAR const* cmdline)
{
    STARTUPINFO si;
    memset(&si, 0, sizeof(si));
    si.cb = sizeof(si);
    PROCESS_INFORMATION pi;
    memset(&pi, 0, sizeof(pi));
    ::CreateProcess(NULL, cmdline, NULL, NULL, FALSE, CREATE_NO_WINDOW, NULL, NULL, &si, &pi);
    ::CloseHandle(pi.Thread);
    ::WaitForSingleObject(pi.hProcess, INFINITE);
    DWORD exitcode;
    ::GetExitCodeProcess(pi.hProcess, &exitcode);
    ::CloseHandle(pi.hProcess);
    return exitcode;
}

If you want to retrieve the output of the command you could also provide hStdOutput, hStdError in the STARTUPINFO structure and set STARTF_USESTDHANDLES in STARTUPINFO.dwFlags. You can even do other things in your own program while the command is executing (especially as you mentioned file copy). This one is done the C++ way:

/*
 * TODO: Error checking should be added for
 *   CreateProcess()
 *   WaitForSingleObject()
 *   GetExitCodeProcess()
 */
class AsyncCmd
{
public:
    AsyncCmd(std::string const& cmdline)
        : cmdline(cmdline),
          processHandle(NULL)
    {
    }
    ~AsyncCmd()
    {
        if (this->processHandle != NULL)
            ::CloseHandle(this->processHandle);
    }
    // Starts the execution of the commandline.
    void Start(HANDLE hOut = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), HANDLE hErr = GetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE))
    {
        STARTUPINFO si;
        memset(&si, 0, sizeof(si));
        si.cb = sizeof(si);
        si.dwFlags = STARTF_USESTDHANDLES;
        si.hStdInput = GetStdHandle(STD_INPUT_HANDLE);
        si.hStdOutput = hOut;
        si.hStdError = hErr;
        PROCESS_INFORMATION pi;
        memset(&pi, 0, sizeof(pi));
        ::CreateProcess(NULL, this->cmdline.c_str(), NULL, NULL, FALSE, CREATE_NO_WINDOW, NULL, NULL, &si, &pi);
        ::CloseHandle(pi.hThread);
        this->processHandle = pi.hProcess;
    }
    // Blocks until execution is finished and returns the exit code.
    DWORD ExitCode()
    {
        ::WaitForSingleObject(this->processHandle, INFINITE);
        DWORD exitcode;
        ::GetExitCodeProcess(this->processHandle, &exitcode);
        return exitcode;
    }
private:
    AsyncCmd(AsyncCmd const&);
    AsyncCmd& operator=(AsyncCmd const&);
    std::string cmdline;
    HANDLE processHandle;
}
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It will run on XP and Win7. –  ciyo Nov 16 '12 at 23:02
    
I think one should add that pipes are a good "dead end" for the hStdOutput and hStdError, since s(he) wants to suppress the output of the executed program. –  0xC0000022L Nov 16 '12 at 23:35
    
Wow! It's cool but a little advanced for me... So, I wonder that could you suggest a tutorial or a C++ topic, which has to be learnt, that makes the code understandable for me? I'm really keen to improve my C++ skills and abilities. –  ciyo Nov 16 '12 at 23:44
    
Best resource for understanding the Windows API calls is definitely the MSDN but for that you have to know what you are searching for. For C++ in general I once liked this, especially the Object Oriented Programming part. –  Max Truxa Nov 16 '12 at 23:51
    
I have general C++ knowledge, there is no problem about it. But, I couldn't understand the code lines that was written by you... I guess, only way to understand them learning Windows API, right? –  ciyo Nov 16 '12 at 23:59
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To rephrase what's already been said:

Q: Can you somehow intercept an error thrown by a command you've invoked via "system()"?

A: No. For many reasons.

But you can redirect the textual error message that's written by the command line program:

  • Redirecting "stderr" is relatively easy. "GetStdHandle(STD_ERROR_HANDLE)" is one way. Redirecting to "> :err" is another.

  • Unfortunately, not all programs are nice enough to write error messages to "stderr".

    Many write everything to "stdout".

In the latter case, you'd have to figure out 1) that an error actually occurred, and 2) figure out how to separate the parts of the text input that are "standard output", vs those parts that are "error text".

PS:

An alternative API to "system()" is "popen()".

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One brute force way to do it would be to pipe the output of the CMD i.e. yourCommand > file.txt to a file and then read the file contents to determine if there was an exception.

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If I cannot solve the problem, try this method. Thank you! –  ciyo Nov 16 '12 at 23:02
    
Actually this will literally only work if and only if cmd.exe is used as the shell explicitly in the command line, because of the shell redirection you are trying to use here. Also 2> can be used to redirect stderr, not just stdout, and NUL can be used analogous to /dev/null on unixoid systems to suppress the output altogether. –  0xC0000022L Nov 16 '12 at 23:39
    
For completeness: you can force the use of cmd.exe by prepending the command with %COMSPEC% /c. And cmd.exe supports up to 10 handles, not just stdin, stdout and stderr. –  Ansgar Wiechers Nov 17 '12 at 10:56
    
I will leave this up, just for historical record, but @yourmt 's answer is clearly the best. Use his. –  Jonathan Henson Nov 17 '12 at 20:00
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Adding to what yourmt wrote, I'd like to point out that exceptions won't bleed through across process boundaries. So what you are tackling here is the output (both stderr and stdout) of the executed program (and shell) plus its exit code (in case this provides any useful information). This is mostly so you understand that this is literally not about exception handling as your title implies.

That means you can set hStdOutput and hStdError when using CreateProcess/CreateProcessEx to use pipes that you control and where you "catch" the output and then replace it with your own before outputting it to the console. In case you want to only replace stderr you can also do that.

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You can use

#include "Exception.h"

class MyClass
{
public:
    class Error : public Exception { };
    MyClass();
    ~MyClass();
    void myFunction() throw(Error);
}

...

catch (MyClass::Error & error)
{
    cout << error.full_message << endl;

    return;
}

and

class Exception
{
public:
    std::string message;
    std::string full_message;

    virtual char * info() { return ""; };

    void setMessage(std::string msg)
    {
        message = msg;
        if (*info() == 0) { full_message = msg; }
        else { full_message = MakeString() << info() << " " << msg; }
    }
};

// template function ///////////////////////////////////////////

template <class errType>
void Throw(const std::string msg=std::string(""))
{
errType err;
err.setMessage(msg);

throw(err);
}
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2  
This has nothing to do with handling error messages printed to stdout from cmd.exe –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 16 '12 at 22:49
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