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Long story short, i have something like this:

template < int TSize >
class Table
{
public:
    void someInterface();

private:

    int array[TSize];
};


template < int TSize >
class SomeBigWrap
{
    SomeBigWrap() : table(), stuff(&table) {}
    Table<Tsize> table;

    OtherStuff_1 stuff;
};

class OtherStuff_1
{

    OtherStuff_1( Table * p) : pTable(p) {}
    const Table * pTable;

    void someFnc()
    {
        pTable->someInterface();
    }
};

Class OtherSuff_1 needs a pointer to a table and access to it's interface. But i can't just make a pointer to a template class.

I wonder, is there some way to "pass down" to the OtherStuff a type of table in current instance of SomeBigWrap, WITHOUT making OtherStuff a template or using virtual functions?

I can't inherit all tables from one ITable, because it's interface must interact with array (and i'm trying to avoid using virtual functions).

Is there some other way round? Some form of duck typing maybe? Or should i completely rethiink my design?

share|improve this question
2  
I vote "completely rethink". –  Kerrek SB Nov 16 '12 at 23:44
    
Further to that, arrays are usually always a bad thing in C++, unless they're immediately initialized. The conceptual problem is that all array members always exist, in the sense of objects, which is very rarely a correct model of the problem. Something like a std::vector is a lot more appropriate in almost every situation (or at least a similar approach that separates memory allocation from object construction). –  Kerrek SB Nov 16 '12 at 23:49
    
I should point out, that ALL objects in my system are static. No need of dynamic allocation at all. That's why i want to avoid using heap. –  Amomum Nov 17 '12 at 0:00

3 Answers 3

I'm afraid there's not much you can do and you should probably redesign or just use templates or virtual. Anyway, here are some slight modifications:

You might consider not storing the pointer at all and instead passing it as an argument for each function:

class OtherStuff_1
{

    template<int TSize>
    void someFnc(const Table<TSize> * pTable)
    {
        pTable->someInterface();
    }
};

Nested classes could work:

template < int TSize >
class SomeBigWrap
{
    class OtherStuff_1
    {

        OtherStuff_1( Table * p) : pTable(p) {}
        const Table<TSize> * pTable;

        void someFnc()
        {
            pTable->someInterface();
        }
    };  
    SomeBigWrap() : table(), stuff(&table) {}
    Table<Tsize> table;

    OtherStuff_1 stuff;
};

You could also use void* which isn't recommended.

share|improve this answer
    
Stuff classes have about ten methods each, not very pleasing to make them all templates. Nesting will bloap Wrapper class to unbelievable size. To call a method for void * i still need to know correct type, don't i? Maybe i can pass down a pointer to wrapping function? Hmm. –  Amomum Nov 16 '12 at 23:56

You need to specify the template argument when you want to use a template:

OtherStuff_1( Table<SomeSize> * p) : pTable(p) {}
const Table<SomeSize> * pTable;

You probably wanted to define it like so

template <int TSize>
class OtherStuff_1
{
    OtherStuff_1( Table<TSize> * p) : pTable(p) {}
    const Table<TSize> * pTable;

    void someFnc()
    {
        pTable->someInterface();
    }
};

... and use it in SomeBigWrap as

OtherStuff_1<TSize> stuff;
share|improve this answer
    
There to much Stuff inside wrapper and almost all of it needs access to each other. At first, all Stuff classes were connected through callbacks, but that was to complicated. So i brought up a Wrapper class, to bind them. If i put all other classes definitons inside Wrapper, it will be gigantic. –  Amomum Nov 16 '12 at 23:54
    
Oh, sorry, I somehow thought that OtherStuff_1 was nested inside SomeBigWrap. I'll adjust the answer... –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 16 '12 at 23:58

If you were to make a non-template base class of Table and give that base class an int * and a size_t then the template's constructor can assign the base pointer to the array and the size of the array to the size variable. Then you can hand out pointers to the base class of the Table<TSize> which appear to be some kind of dynamic array.

In fact, I would make the base class mirror a vector as much as possible.

Sample code:

#include <iostream>

class TableBase {
public:
    typedef int value_type;
    typedef value_type* pointer;
    typedef value_type& reference;
    typedef pointer iterator;
    typedef const pointer const_iterator;
    typedef size_t size_type;

    TableBase(pointer table, size_type size) : m_array(table), m_size(size)
    {}
    iterator begin() const
    {
        return m_array;
    }
    iterator end() const
    {
        return m_array + m_size;
    }
    size_t size() const
    {
        return m_size;
    }
private:
    pointer   m_array;
    size_type m_size;
};

template<size_t TSize>
class Table: public TableBase
{
public:
    Table() : TableBase(array, TSize)
    {
        for(size_t i=0; i<TSize; ++i)
            array[i] = i;
    }

private:
    int array[TSize];
};

int main()
{
    Table<16> t;

    TableBase *tp = &t;

    for( TableBase::iterator i = tp->begin(); i != tp->end(); ++i ) {
        std::cout << *i << ',';
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Avoiding of virtual functions is, in fact, avoiding of heap using :( –  Amomum Nov 16 '12 at 23:55
    
@Amomum: My idea has no heap in it at all. –  Zan Lynx Nov 17 '12 at 0:02
    
@Amomum: The key phrase was "appears to be", not "is" a dynamic array. I should have simply said it is best to mirror the Standard Library STL containers as much as possible. –  Zan Lynx Nov 17 '12 at 0:05

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