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I'm not sure I understand what transitionFromViewController:toViewController:duration:options:animation:completion: does exactly. Is it just a convenience method?

For instance, what's the difference between doing this...

[self transitionFromViewController:fromViewController
                  toViewController:toViewController
                          duration:0.25
                           options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseInOut
                        animations:^{
                            fromViewController.view.alpha = 0;
                            toViewController.view.alpha = 1;
                        } completion:^(BOOL finished) {
                            [fromViewController removeFromParentViewController];
                            [toViewController didMoveToParentViewController:self];
                        }];

...and this?

[self.view addSubview:toViewController.view];
[UIView animateWithDuration:0.25
                      delay:0
                    options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseOut
                 animations:^{
                     fromViewController.view.alpha = 0;
                     toViewController.view.alpha = 1;
                 } completion:^(BOOL finished){
                     [fromViewController.view removeFromSuperview];
                     [fromViewController removeFromParentViewController];
                     [toViewController didMoveToParentViewController:self];
                 }];

The reason I ask is that in some cases I need to add the child controller view to a specific subview of the container controller view. Using transitionFromViewController:toViewController:duration:options:animation:completion: does not give me this option.

share|improve this question
1  
When I do transitionFromViewController, I frequently have the fromViewController.view inside a subview, and it will add the toViewController.view to the same subview (which is pretty important). Or are you saying that you want the toViewController.view to go into a different subview? –  Rob Nov 17 '12 at 13:39
    
No, I want the same than you. And I tried it and it works! Thanks! Wouldn't have hurt to include this nifty behavior in the documentation. –  hpique Nov 17 '12 at 14:02
    
@Rob Thanks for sharing that piece of info. You should include that in your answer. I have the exact same use cases and didn't know that the method puts the child view in the correct position automatically. Time saved, thanks! –  chakrit Apr 30 at 8:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Yes, I think you're right: They appear to be functionally the same (not sure we can call it a convenience method without knowing the details of the implementation, but could well be). Obviously, transitionFromViewController is designed for view controller containment and animateWithDuration is designed a general purpose animation of views.

Given that you're obviously doing containment, one probably should use transitionFromViewController rather than animateWithDuration. It's unambiguous and the technique recommended by Apple. And if you have the fromViewController.view in a subview, the new toViewController.view will be added to the same subview.

I'd also suggest including the missing willMoveToParentViewController and addChildViewController (which I assume you omitted for the sake of brevity, but I include for the sake of completeness):

[fromViewController willMoveToParentViewController:nil];
[self addChildViewController:toViewController];

[self transitionFromViewController:fromViewController
                  toViewController:toViewController
                          duration:0.25
                           options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseInOut | UIViewAnimationOptionTransitionCrossDissolve
                        animations:^{}
                        completion:^(BOOL finished){
                            [fromViewController removeFromParentViewController];
                            [toViewController didMoveToParentViewController:self];
                        }];

Also note that I'm using UIViewAnimationOptionTransitionCrossDissolve. If you're setting alphas manually, don't forget to initialize the toViewController.view.alpha, e.g.:

[fromViewController willMoveToParentViewController:nil];
[self addChildViewController:toViewController];
toViewController.view.alpha = 0.0;

[self transitionFromViewController:fromViewController
                  toViewController:toViewController
                          duration:0.25
                           options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseInOut
                        animations:{
                            fromViewController.view.alpha = 0.0;
                            toViewController.view.alpha = 1.0;
                        }
                        completion:^(BOOL finished){
                            [fromViewController removeFromParentViewController];
                            [toViewController didMoveToParentViewController:self];
                        }];
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Please bear in mind that animations must not be null, as stated in the doc. –  hpique Nov 17 '12 at 8:43
    
Edited to question to clarify why it might need be useful to use the animateWithDuration version directly. –  hpique Nov 17 '12 at 9:13
    
Didn't know about non-NULL animation block. Replaced with empty animation block. It strikes me as an absurd requirement because the options that start with UIViewAnimationOptionTransition often obviate the need for any animation block. But it is what it is. –  Rob Nov 17 '12 at 14:45
2  
in the WWDC2011 video for view container containment the Apple dev passes in nil for the animation block –  jfisk May 17 '13 at 4:46

As the docs say, it's intended to be used to transition between two child view controllers, not two views of the same child view controller.

In your first code snippet, you are passing the same toViewController as the first two parameters. It's intended that this is two different view controllers, not the same one.

Your second example is more appropriate if you are just switching views of the same view controller.

share|improve this answer
    
I meant to use two different view controllers. I was editing the code while you answered. Apologies. –  hpique Nov 16 '12 at 23:56

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