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I have the following code which uses strtok which receives input from a txt file. The input in the txt file is:

age, (4, years, 5, months)
age, (8, years, 7, months)
age, (4, years, 5, months)

My code looks like:

char * point;
ifstream file;
file.open(file.c_str());

if(file.is_open())
{
    while(file.good())
    {
        getline(file, take);
        point = strtok(&take[0], ", ()");
    }
}

It is doing fine except the output of the 2nd age and 3rd age is missing. Can anyone tell me why are they missing?

Also I tried istringstream but whenever I enter my filename the program crashes.

char * point;
char take[256];
ifstream file;
file.open(file.c_str());

if(file.is_open())
{
    while(file.good())
    {
        cin.getline(take, 256);
        point =strtok(take,", ()");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What does that second snippet of code do? –  Xymostech Nov 17 '12 at 1:41
    
I'm trying to do the same thing using istringstream. But I do not know why it crashes when the filename is entered. –  user1823986 Nov 17 '12 at 3:48

1 Answer 1

Personally, I would use an std::istringstream but I would use it differently (... and, yes, I know that I could use sscanf() as well and that the code would be shorter but I dislike the type-unsafe interface)! I would play tricks with manipulators:

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>

template <char C>
std::istream& skip(std::istream& in)
{
    if ((in >> std::ws).peek() != std::char_traits<char>::to_int_type(C)) {
        in.setstate(std::ios_base::failbit);
    }
    return in.ignore();
}

std::istream& (*const comma)(std::istream&) = &skip<','>;
std::istream& (*const open)(std::istream&) = &skip<'('>;
std::istream& (*const close)(std::istream&) = &skip<')'>;

struct token
{
    token(std::string const& value): value_(value) {}
    std::string::const_iterator begin() const { return this->value_.begin(); }
    std::string::const_iterator end() const   { return this->value_.end(); }
    std::string value_;
};

std::istream& operator>> (std::istream& in, token const& t)
{
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char> it(in >> std::ws), end;
    for (std::string::const_iterator sit(t.begin()), send(t.end());
         it != end && sit != send; ++it, ++sit) {
        if (*it != *sit) {
            in.setstate(std::ios_base::failbit);
            break;
        }
    }
    return in;
}

int main()
{
    std::istringstream input("age, (4, years, 5, months)\n"
                             "age , ( 8 , years , 7, months )\n"
                             "age, (4, year, 5, months)\n"
                             "age, (4, years 5, months)\n"
                             "age (4, years, 5, months)\n"
                             "age, 4, years, 5, months)\n"
                             "age, (4, years, 5, months)\n");
    std::string dummy;
    int         year, month;
    for (std::string line; std::getline(input, line); ) {
        std::istringstream lin(line);
        if (lin >> token("age") >> comma
            >> open
            >> year >> comma >> token("years") >> comma
            >> month >> comma >> token("months") >> close) {
            std::cout << "year=" << year << " month=" << month << "\n";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks a bit hefty, but very complete. –  Xymostech Nov 17 '12 at 1:51
1  
@Xymostech: Most of it is infrastructure which can be used in other contexts as well. Maybe it's time to look into a typesafe version similar to scanf() as well, built on std::istream and using variadic... –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 17 '12 at 1:55
    
+1 For the manipulator tricks. The main code looks more readable. –  Thomas Matthews Nov 17 '12 at 2:21
    
Sorry, is there any simpler way to do it? Because I just started learning c++ for 2months so I don't understand most of the implementation of your code. –  user1823986 Nov 17 '12 at 3:51
    
@user1823986: You can skip the first manipulator and entirely work with tokens. If you don't accept extra spaces, e.g., between age and ,, you can then combine them. The token processing using fairly fundamental C++ techniques and, e.g., avoids defining a template. If you have concrete questions, I can answer them. –  Dietmar Kühl Nov 17 '12 at 13:27

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