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Here is the Twitter message I am trying to parse (as you can see, some of these are not tags, just part of URLs):

#anothertag Arrogance and bad PR http://www.adobe.com/index.html#anchor1. John 
Nack on &#Adobe: Information about Photoshop© CS3 on Snow Leopard 
#fail #design</pre>

This regular expression is what I have so far, but it still picks up some the url tags:

[##]+([A-Za-z0-9-_]+)
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So what exactly are you trying to get? Can you provide expected result? –  serg Aug 27 '09 at 18:05
    
Sorry, I should have been more clear. I am trying to do a match to find what are all the tags in a given tweet. I would expect that the tweet from above would return 'anothertag', 'fail' and 'design'. –  Daniel Dura Aug 27 '09 at 18:14
    
Did you try this one? stackoverflow.com/questions/1563844/best-hashtag-regex/… The regex arcain provides is based on Twitter's code and if I'm reading it right it ensures that the message does not begin with a hashtag. If you wanted to disable that you could remove the first parenthesized group. Should mention that I haven't tested this regex personally though :) –  johncip Apr 8 at 1:06
    
there's a much better answer here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4984806/… –  Rafael Roman Apr 20 at 22:11

3 Answers 3

Isn't it ironic, as soon as I post this I find an answer. So if you are looking for a matching pattern to do this, the following seems to work:

(?:\s|\A)[##]+([A-Za-z0-9-_]+)

I am going to do a lot more testing with this to see if there are any edge cases that are outside the scope of this expression and will report back if I find any.

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2  
(?:\s|\A|^)[##]+([A-Za-z0-9-_]+) also accepts a hashtag at the very beginning of the tweet –  benjguin Oct 5 '12 at 8:15

@Daniel Dura: [##] this is supposed to be pointless. The brackets [] are used to denote character classes. [##] is same as [#]. And [##]+ is same as [#]+ .

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I think this

(\s|\A)#(\w+)

works as well and is a little more precise. BTW, when working with Java regular expressions I always use regexplanet to test my expressions. Much faster than testing in Java.

--Hardy

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