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Why this program only works when I initialize a and b. I want to pass it without initializing a and b, for example:

numChange(10,15);

Is this possible ?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void numChange(int *x,int *y)
{
     *x = 99;
     *y = 77;
}

int main()
{
    numChange(10,15);
    //int a=10;
    //int b=15;
    //numChange(&a,&b);
    cout<<a<<" , "<<b<<endl;

    return 0;
}
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I still say use a const reference, despite the fact that you're changing what you pass in. Why do you want it to work with literals when it changes them? You need to rethink what you're trying to do if you want things to work that way, or any answer you get will obviously not work because it's not possible for a good reason. –  chris Nov 17 '12 at 1:43
    
You don't pass by reference with pointers...you pass by reference with references. :) If you want to pass by pointer, that's what it's called. –  cHao Nov 17 '12 at 1:54
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you define your function to receive pointers, but when you call it you are trying to pass a int.

The compiler is aspecting memory addresses and you are trying to pass constants.

It don't make any sense, you are trying do something like: 10 = 99; 15 = 77; ?

numChange(10,15);
    //int a=10;
    //int b=15;

It seems that you are hopping that a = 10 = 99 and b = 15 = 77;

If this was possible, it means that I could never (after the call of numChange(10,15);) make a variable to actually have the value 10 because 10 is "pointing" to 99 (is not).

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Thank you very helpful –  Karish Karish Nov 17 '12 at 2:07
    
Np, You Welcome. –  dreamcrash Nov 17 '12 at 2:07
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Recall: a pointer is an integer containing a location in memory.

This:

int a, b;
...
a = b;

copies the integer stored at the memory location reserved for 'b' to the memory location reserved for 'a'.

This:

int *a, b;
...
a = &b;

stores the location of 'b' in 'a'. Following it with this:

*a = 42;

will store 42 in the memory location stored in 'a', which is the variable 'b'.

Now, let's look at your code. This:

void numChange(int *x,int *y)

tells the compiler that 'numChange' will be called with two pointers--that is, memory addresses. This part:

 *x = 99;
 *y = 77;

then stores two integers at the locations given in 'x' and 'y'.

When you call:

numChange(10,15);

the arguments are integers instead of memory location. However under the hood, memory locations are also integers so the compiler converts the arguments to pointers. Effectively, it's doing this:

numChange((int *)10, (int*)15);

(It should issue a warning when this happens, since it's almost never a good idea, but it will do it.)

Basically, your call to 'numChange' tells it that there are integer variables at memory addresses 10 and 15, and 'numChange' carries on and stores integers at those memory locations. Since there aren't variables (that we know of) at those locations, this code actually overwrites some other data somewhere.

Meanwhile, this code:

int a=10;
int b=15;
numChange(&a,&b);

creates two integer variables and then passes their addresses in memory to 'numChange'. BTW, you don't actually need to initialize them. This works too:

int a, b;
numChange(&a,&b);

What's important is that the variables are created (and the compiler sets aside RAM for them) and that their locations are then passed to 'numChange'.

(One aside: I'm treating variables as always being stored in RAM. It's safe to think of them this way but modern compilers will try to store them in CPU registers as much as possible for performance reasons, copying them back into RAM when needed.)

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Thank you so much, very clear explanation –  Karish Karish Nov 17 '12 at 19:26
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