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I'm using D3 to create a large object filled with a gradient, but the larger the object, the gradient becomes less smooth. The following is an example of code that creates such type of artifacts:

 <script type="text/javascript" src="http://mbostock.github.com/d3/d3.js?1.27.1">
 <script type="text/javascript">

var w = 4000,
    h = 100,
    m = 50;

var svg = d3.select("body").append("svg:svg")
    .attr("width", w)
    .attr("height", h);

var gradient = svg.append("svg:defs")
  .append("svg:linearGradient")
    .attr("id", "gradient")
    .attr("x1", "0%")
    .attr("y1", "0%")
    .attr("x2", "100%")
    .attr("y2", "0%")
    .attr("spreadMethod", "pad");

for (i=0; i<m; i++) {
    gradient.append("svg:stop")
        .attr("offset", (i*100.0)/(m-1.0) + "%")
        .attr("stop-color", "hsl(240,0%,"+(i%2)*100+"%)")
        .attr("stop-opacity", 1);
}

svg.append("svg:rect")
    .attr("width", w)
    .attr("height", h)
    .style("fill", "url(#gradient)");

  </script>

Is it possible to increase the gradient smoothing with some SVG attribute?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a bug with Chrome's implementation of gradients, it happens with CSS gradients too. http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=41756. It works fine in all browsers except Chrome.

Fortunately in your case there's a workaround: use spreadMethod: reflect; which will allow you to state the gradient in a smaller area and just let the browser repeat it:

var gradient = svg.append("svg:defs")
  .append("svg:linearGradient")
    .attr("id", "gradient")
    .attr("x1", "0%")
    .attr("y1", "0%")
    .attr("x2", "2%")
    .attr("y2", "0%")
    .attr("spreadMethod", "reflect");

gradient.append("svg:stop")
  .attr("offset", 0)
  .attr("stop-color", "black")
  .attr("stop-opacity", 1);

gradient.append("svg:stop")
  .attr("offset", 1)
  .attr("stop-color", "white")
  .attr("stop-opacity", 1);

This is also has better performance. Hopefully your actual viz looks somewhat similar!

You can see a demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/uKH4j/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out the Chrome bug. In Firefox it works great. However, the workaround is not practical in my case, as the different stop colors should have different values - the figure should represent different densities in a measurement (that's why I'm using hsl). Also dividing the big figure in multiple figures is not an option. –  André Panisson Nov 17 '12 at 13:06
    
Well, the hard way to get around it is to break up the rect into multiples of them, with multiple gradients that yield a single long one. You might get rendering artifacts though, where two rectangles meet. –  meetamit Nov 18 '12 at 1:14

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