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When I view the nyt news feed xml it is rendered as xhtml ..http://rss.nytimes.com/services/xml/rss/nyt/US.xml Is there a way I can see just the xml instead of xhtml to understand the structure.

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The link you cited IS XML. Do a "view source":

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?><?xml-stylesheet type='text/xsl' href='http://rss.nytimes.com/xsl/eng/rss.xsl'?>
<rss xmlns:itunes="http://www.itunes.com/dtds/podcast-1.0.dtd" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:taxo="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/taxonomy/" xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#" xmlns:atom="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom" xmlns:media="http://search.yahoo.com/mrss/" version="2.0">
<channel>
  <atom:link href="http://www.nytimes.com/services/xml/rss/nyt/US.xml" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml" />
  <title>NYT &gt; U.S.</title>
  <link>http://www.nytimes.com/pages/national/index.html?partner=rss&amp;emc=rss</link>
  <description>US</description>
  <language>en-us</language>
  <copyright>Copyright 2012 The New York Times Company</copyright>
  <pubDate>Sat, 17 Nov 2012 03:50:41 GMT</pubDate>
  <lastBuildDate>Sat, 17 Nov 2012 03:50:41 GMT</lastBuildDate>
  <ttl>5</ttl>
  <image><title>NYT &gt; U.S.</title>
    <url>http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/misc/NYT_logo_rss_250x40.png</url>
    <link>http://www.nytimes.com/pages/national/index.html?partner=rss&amp;emc=rss</link>
  </image>
  <item>
    <atom:link href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/17/us/back-when-a-ring-ding-tasted-guiltily-like-america.html?partner=rss&amp;emc=rss" rel="standout" />
    <title>This Land: Back When a Ring Ding Tasted, Guiltily, Like America</title>
    <link>http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/17/us/back-when-a-ring-ding-tasted-guiltily-like-america.html?partner=rss&amp;emc=rss</link>
    <description>Consumers already knew that not everything is good for you, and this was never truer than with a Twinkie, a Sno Ball or a Ring Ding — the Ding Dong equivalent in the Northeast.&lt;img width='1' height='1' src='http://rss.nytimes.com/c/34625/f/642562/s/25ac040b/mf.gif' border='0'/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;a href="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/148659072988/u/353/f/642562/c/34625/s/25ac040b/a2.htm"&gt;&lt;img src="http://da.feedsportal.com/r/148659072988/u/353/f/642562/c/34625/s/25ac040b/a2.img" border="0"/&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;img width="1" height="1" src="http://pi.feedsportal.com/r/148659072988/u/353/f/642562/c/34625/s/25ac040b/a2t.img" border="0"/&gt;</description>
    <category domain="http://www.nytimes.com/namespaces/keywords/nyt_org_all">Hostess Brands</category>
    <category domain="http://www.nytimes.com/namespaces/keywords/mdes">Food</category>
    ...
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