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I have this function that format big numbers.

public static String ToEngineeringNotation(Double d, String unit, int decimals) {
        double exponent = Math.log10(Math.abs(d));
        if (d != 0)
        {
            String result = "0";
            switch ((int)Math.floor(exponent))
            {
                case -2: case -1: case 0: case 1: case 2:
                    result = (d + "").replace(".", ",") + " " + unit;
                    break;
                case 3: case 4: case 5:
                    result = ((d / 1e3) + "").replace(".", ",") + " k" + unit;
                    break;
                case 6: case 7: case 8:
                    result = ((d / 1e6) + "").replace(".", ",") + " M" + unit;
                    break;
                default:
                    result = ((d / 1e9) + "").replace(".", ",") + " G" + unit;
                    break;
            }

            if (result.contains(",")) {
                if (result.indexOf(" ") - result.indexOf(",") >= decimals) {
                    result = result.substring(0, result.indexOf(",") + decimals + 1) + result.substring(result.indexOf(" "));
                }
                if (decimals <= 0)
                    result = result.replace(",", "");
            }
            return result;
        } else {
            return "0 " + unit;
        }
    }

If I give 3866500.0 I want to get 3.9 M, instead I get is 3,8 M, because the algorithm doesn't round to the nearest upper value. I don't have a clue how to do that.

Any idea ?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd suggest java.text.NumberFormat:

public static String ToEngineeringNotation(double d, String unit, int decimals) {
    String m = "";
    if (d > 1000000000) {
        d = d / 1000000000;
        m = " G";
    } else if (d > 1000000) {
        d = d / 1000000;
        m = " M";
    } else  if (d > 1000) {
        d = d / 1000;
        m = " K";
    }
    NumberFormat f = NumberFormat.getInstance();
    f.setGroupingUsed(false);
    f.setMinimumFractionDigits(decimals);
    f.setMaximumFractionDigits(decimals);
    return f.format(d) + m + " " + unit;
}

Note that NumberFormat will choose decimal separator depending on your locale, which is probably what you want. If you want it to be comma always then use NumberFormat.getInstance(Locale.GERMAN)

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Oh, the problem is that you are removing the decimals AFTER you make it a string. It's easier to do it the other way, in other words:

case 6: case 7: case 8:
    double divide = (d / 1e6d) * ;
    double roundFactor = Math.pow(10, decimals);
    result = (Math.round(divide * roundFactor) / roundFactor) + "").replace(".", ",") + " M" + unit;
    break;

This is not the cleanest way but I wanted to show you the idea. Do rounding with math, not strings.

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I changed my old answer (it was totally wrong), this is correct. –  durron597 Nov 17 '12 at 5:23
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I suggest converting your data to java.math.BigDecimal. It has several rounding modes, including rounding towards positive infinity. I believe your formatting would be easier starting from a decimal-scaled representation.

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