Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I want to send an asynchronous AJAX request to the server, and when it responds send another request and repeat forever:

function sendXHR(url, callback) {
    // Send XMLHttpRequest to server and call callback when response is received
}

function infinite() {
    sendXHR('url/path', infinite);
}

infinite();

I assume here we would run out of stack space pretty quickly, so how can I do this (without blocking)?

The pattern of passing callbacks around rather than using return is particularly popular with node.js. How do people create infinite loops? I don't believe most JS engines do any kind of tail call optimisation.

share|improve this question
2  
That would not run out of stack space as when the callback is called the stack frames below it do not contain the stack of the previous infinite call. –  Dan D. Nov 17 '12 at 4:49
    
@DanD. I tried it in Chrome by adding callback(); in sendXHR, and it reports Maximum call stack size exceeded after around 9500 iterations. Firefox also says too much recursion. –  Andrew Nov 17 '12 at 4:51
    
Well then maybe there's something interesting in the Send XMLHttpRequest to server and call callback when response is received part. –  mu is too short Nov 17 '12 at 4:56
    
@muistooshort Sorry don't follow, am I missing something obvious? –  Andrew Nov 17 '12 at 4:58
    
I'm guessing your sendXHR function is using synchronous xhr then? Change this to asynchronous and execute the callback on the next tick. –  Sean Kinsey Nov 17 '12 at 4:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your ajax call is asynchronous, you do not run out of stack space because sendXHR() returns immediately after the ajax request is sent. The callback is then called some time later when the ajax response arrives. There is no stack build up.


If your ajax call is synchronous and you want to allow other events and what not to happen in the javascript environment, then you could so something like this:

function sendXHR(url, callback) {
    // Send XMLHttpRequest to server and call callback when response is received
}

function infinite() {
    sendXHR('url/path');
    setTimeout(infinite, 1);
}

infinite();
share|improve this answer
    
His comments seem to prove that he does indeed run out of stack space, so it looks like he's sing synchronous XHR. –  Sean Kinsey Nov 17 '12 at 5:00
    
@SeanKinsey - since the OP was not clear about synch vs. async, I've now included answers for both. –  jfriend00 Nov 17 '12 at 5:03
    
Thanks, you are of course right.. there is no stack build up if it's asynchronous. –  Andrew Nov 17 '12 at 5:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.