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I have a text file like below, I want to replace the old string between 2 characters(in this case is ^ and |) with new string (in this case will be replaced to old string ^ old string)if the line start with specific string (in this example is MMX.

text file original:

General start, this is a test file.
TAG okay, this line not need to be processed.
MMX ABCD ^string1|other strings abc
CCF ABCD ^string2|other strings cde, skip line
MMX CDEE ^String3|other strings aaa
MMX AAAA ^String4|other strings bbb
CCD BBBB ^String5|other strings ccc, skip line

text file after modify should be:

General start, this is a test file.
TAG okay, this line not need to be processed.
MMX ABCD ^string1^String1|other strings abc
CCF ABCD ^string2|other strings cde, skip line
MMX CDEE ^String3^String3|other strings aaa
MMX AAAA ^String4^String4|other strings bbb
CCD BBBB ^String5|other strings ccc, skip line

How can I use shell scripts to perform this job?

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6 Answers

Here's one way using sed:

sed '/^MMX/s/\(\^[^|]*\)/\1\1/' file.txt

Results:

General start, this is a test file.
TAG okay, this line not need to be processed.
MMX ABCD ^string1^string1|other strings abc
CCF ABCD ^string2|other strings cde, skip line
MMX CDEE ^String3^String3|other strings aaa
MMX AAAA ^String4^String4|other strings bbb
CCD BBBB ^String5|other strings ccc, skip line
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this resolve my question, thanks –  user1831356 Nov 17 '12 at 6:57
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@user1831356: If this solution, or any other solution here, has worked for you, you should consider accepting it by clicking the accept tick to the left of your favorite answer. Thanks! –  Steve Nov 17 '12 at 8:11
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Just for completeness:

$ awk '/^MMX/{sub(/\^[^|]+/,"&&")}1' file
General start, this is a test file.
TAG okay, this line not need to be processed.
MMX ABCD ^string1^string1|other strings abc
CCF ABCD ^string2|other strings cde, skip line
MMX CDEE ^String3^String3|other strings aaa
MMX AAAA ^String4^String4|other strings bbb
CCD BBBB ^String5|other strings ccc, skip line

but I'd use one of the posted sed solutions since this is a simple substitution on a single line which is what sed is good at.

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You can provide sed with an "address", which is a filter for the lines that the command is executed on:

sed '/^MMX/s/\^(.*)\|/^\1^\1|/g'

in this case, the address is /^MMX/, the command is s///g, and it replaces \^(.*)\| with ^\1^\1|, where \1 is the part in parentheses.

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perl -plne "if(/^MMX/){$_=~s/([^\^]*)([^\|]*)(.*)/$1$2$2$3/g;}" your_file

tested below:

>perl -plne "if(/^MMX/){$_=~s/([^\^]*)([^\|]*)(.*)/$1$2$2$3/g;}" new.txt
General start, this is a test file.
TAG okay, this line not need to be processed.
MMX ABCD ^string1^string1|other strings abc
CCF ABCD ^string2|other strings cde, skip line
MMX CDEE ^String3^String3|other strings aaa
MMX AAAA ^String4^String4|other strings bbb
CCD BBBB ^String5|other strings ccc, skip line
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To ensure capitalization in the new string:

sed '/^MMX/s/\^\([^|]\+\)/^\1^\u\1/'
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Shortcuts like \u are restricted to GNU sed. As a general rule, they should be avoided for portability. –  ghoti Nov 17 '12 at 13:19
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sed s/^MMX([^^])^([^|])\|(.+)/MMX\1^\2^\2\|\3/ fileName

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not working, give this message: sed: -e expression #1, char 38: invalid reference \3 on `s' command's RHS –  user1831356 Nov 17 '12 at 5:49
    
Go to vi and in command mode do :1,$s/^MMX([^^]*)^([^|]*)\|(.+)/MMX\1^\2^\2\|\3/ –  Vishal Kumar Nov 17 '12 at 6:27
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